Amplicon sequencing of bacterial microbiota in abortion material from cattle

Vidal Lopez, Sara; Kegler Schukovsky, Kristel; Posthaus, Horst; Perreten, Vincent; Rodriguez, Sabrina (2017). Amplicon sequencing of bacterial microbiota in abortion material from cattle. Veterinary research, 48(64), pp. 1-15. BioMed Central 10.1186/s13567-017-0470-1

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Abortions in cattle have a significant economic impact on animal husbandry and require prompt diagnosis for sur‑veillance of epizootic infectious agents. Since most abortions are not epizootic but sporadic with often undetected etiologies, this study examined the bacterial community present in the placenta (PL, n= 32) and fetal abomasal content (AC, n= 49) in 64 cases of bovine abortion by next generation sequencing (NGS) of the 16S rRNA gene. The PL and AC from three fetuses of dams that died from non‑infectious reasons were included as controls. All samples were analyzed by bacterial culture, and 17 were examined by histopathology. We observed 922 OTUs overall and 267 taxa at the genus level. No detectable bacterial DNA was present in the control samples. The microbial profiles of the PL and AC differed significantly, both in their composition (PERMANOVA), species richness and Chao‑1 (Mann–Whit‑ney test). In both organs, Pseudomonas was the most abundant genus. The combination of NGS and culture identi‑fied opportunistic pathogens of interest in placentas with lesions, such as Vibrio metschnikovii, Streptococcus uberis, Lactococcus lactis and Escherichia coli. In placentas with lesions where culturing was unsuccessful, Pseudomonas and unidentified Aeromonadaceae were identified by NGS displaying high number of reads. Three cases with multiple possible etiologies and placentas presenting lesions were detected by NGS. Amplicon sequencing has the potential to uncover unknown etiological agents. These new insights on cattle abortion extend our focus to previously under‑studied opportunistic abortive bacteria.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Other Institutions > Teaching Staff, Vetsuisse Faculty
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology > Molecular Bacterial Epidemiology and Infectiology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Animal Pathology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences (GCB)

UniBE Contributor:

Vidal Lopez, Sara; Kegler Schukovsky, Kristel; Posthaus, Horst; Perreten, Vincent and Rodriguez, Sabrina

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

1297-9716

Publisher:

BioMed Central

Funders:

[74] Bundesamt für Lebensmittelsicherheit und Veterinärwesen

Language:

English

Submitter:

Sabrina Rodriguez Campos

Date Deposited:

21 Nov 2017 10:31

Last Modified:

24 Oct 2019 04:25

Publisher DOI:

10.1186/s13567-017-0470-1

PubMed ID:

29017611

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.106105

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/106105

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