Decrease of ethyl glucuronide concentrations in hair after exposure to chlorinated swimming pool water.

Luginbühl, Marc; Nussbaumer, Susanne; Weinmann, Wolfgang (2018). Decrease of ethyl glucuronide concentrations in hair after exposure to chlorinated swimming pool water. Drug testing and analysis, 10(4), pp. 689-693. Wiley 10.1002/dta.2295

[img] Text
etg manuskript_ACCEPTED ARTICLE.docx - Accepted Version
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (177kB)

The direct alcohol marker ethyl glucuronide (EtG) is widely used for the assessment of alcohol consumption behavior and abstinence monitoring by hair analysis. We investigated the influence of chlorinated swimming pool water on EtG concentrations in hair in comparison to deionized water (Milli-Q) containing no chlorine. EtG concentrations were measured with a validated online-SPE-LC-MS/MS method. EtG positive hair samples were obtained from three regular drinkers and incubated for 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 hours at room temperature. EtG concentrations in hair were reduced after two hours of incubation in chlorinated water by 20±12% (range:4-33%), in deionized water by 24±5% (range:18-29%). Incubation for 10 hours resulted in a decrease in EtG concentrations of 57±6% (range:52-65%) for chlorinated water and 47±11% (range:32-60%) for deionized water. To demonstrate washout in forensic hair samples, 20 samples from subjects with known alcohol consumption behavior were investigated additionally. The samples were divided into two strands and analyzed with incubation in chlorinated water for 10 hours and for comparison without any incubation. A mean decrease of 53±18% (range:26-88%) was observed. These results clearly demonstrate that washout effects are caused by water and have a significant impact on EtG concentrations in hair. For people with hair that are regularly exposed to water for a longer period of time (e.g. swimmers), washout effects may lead to a significant decrease of EtG concentrations in hair. Concentrations may fall below threshold concentrations used for the interpretation of consumption habits (7 pg/mg for social consumption, 30 pg/mg for excessive consumption).

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Legal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Legal Medicine > Forensic Chemistry and Toxicology

UniBE Contributor:

Nussbaumer, Susanne and Weinmann, Wolfgang

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1942-7603

Publisher:

Wiley

Language:

English

Submitter:

Antoinette Angehrn

Date Deposited:

17 Oct 2017 10:37

Last Modified:

01 Sep 2018 02:30

Publisher DOI:

10.1002/dta.2295

PubMed ID:

28856820

Uncontrolled Keywords:

EtG alcohol marker drug test adulteration ethyl glucuronide hair analysis

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.106172

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/106172

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback