The learning effects of different presentations of worked examples on medical students’ breaking-bad-news skills: A randomized and blinded field trial

Schmitz, Felix Michael; Schnabel, Kai; Bauer, Daniel; Bachmann, Cadja; Woermann, Ulrich; Guttormsen, Sissel (2018). The learning effects of different presentations of worked examples on medical students’ breaking-bad-news skills: A randomized and blinded field trial. Patient education and counseling, 101(8), pp. 1439-1451. Elsevier Ireland 10.1016/j.pec.2018.02.013

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Objectives: Effective instructional approaches are needed to enable undergraduates to optimally prepare for the limited training time they receive with simulated patients (SPs). This study examines the learning effects of different presentation formats of a worked example on student SP communication. Methods: Sixty-seven fourth-year medical students attending a mandatory communication course participated in this randomized field trial. Prior to the course, they worked through an e-learning module that introduced the SPIKES protocol for delivering bad news to patients. In this module, a single worked example was presented to one group of students in a text version, to a second group in a video version, and to a third group in a video version enriched with text hints denoting the SPIKES steps. Results: The video-with-hints group broke bad news to SPs significantly more appropriately than either of the other groups. Although no further condition-related effects were revealed, students who learned from the text version most frequently (although non-significantly) ignored unpleasant emotions (standardised emotional cues and concerns) expressed by the SPs. Conclusions: The learning effect was strongest when the video-based worked example was accompanied by hints. Practice implications: Video-related learning approaches that embed attention-guiding hints can effectively prepare undergraduates for SP encounters.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute for Medical Education > Master of Medical Education (MME)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute for Medical Education > Assessment and Evaluation Unit (AAE)
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04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute for Medical Education

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Health Sciences (GHS)

UniBE Contributor:

Schmitz, Felix Michael; Schnabel, Kai; Bauer, Daniel; Bachmann, Cadja; Woermann, Ulrich and Guttormsen, Sissel

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0738-3991

Publisher:

Elsevier Ireland

Language:

English

Submitter:

Felix Schmitz

Date Deposited:

23 Apr 2018 11:32

Last Modified:

02 Jul 2018 14:25

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.pec.2018.02.013

PubMed ID:

29501215

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Breaking-bad-news skills learning Worked examples Presentation format Hints Emotional cues and concerns Randomized field trial Simulated patient encounter

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.113822

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/113822

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