Global rise in emerging alien species results from increased accessibility of new source pools

Seebens, H; Blackburn, TM; Dyer, EE; Genovesi, P; Hulme, PE; Jeschke, JM; Pagad, S; Pysek, P; van Kleunen, M; Winter, M; Ansong, M; Arianoutsou, M; Bacher, Sven; Blasius, B; Brockerhoff, EG; Brundu, G; Capinha, C; Causton, CE; Celesti-Grapow, L; Dawson, W; ... (2018). Global rise in emerging alien species results from increased accessibility of new source pools. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - PNAS, 115(10), E2264-E2273. National Academy of Sciences NAS 10.1073/pnas.1719429115

[img] Text
E2264.full.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (814kB) | Request a copy

Our ability to predict the identity of future invasive alien species is largely based upon knowledge of prior invasion history. Emerging alien species—those never encountered as aliens before—there-fore pose a significant challenge to biosecurity interventions worldwide. Understanding their temporal trends, origins, and the drivers of their spread is pivotal to improving prevention and risk assessment tools. Here, we use a database of 45,984 first records of 16,019 established alien species to investigate the temporal dy-namics of occurrences of emerging alien species worldwide. Even after many centuries of invasions the rate of emergence of new alien species is still high: One-quarter of first records during 2000–2005 were of species that had not been previously recorded any-where as alien, though with large variation across taxa. Model results show that the high proportion of emerging alien species cannot be solely explained by increases in well-known drivers such as the amount of imported commodities from historically impor-tant source regions. Instead, these dynamics reflect the incorpora-tion of new regions into the pool of potential alien species, likely as a consequence of expanding trade networks and environmental change. This process compensates for the depletion of the histor-ically important source species pool through successive invasions. We estimate that 1–16% of all species on Earth, depending on the taxonomic group, qualify as potential alien species. These results suggest that there remains a high proportion of emerging alien species we have yet to encounter, with future impacts that are difficult to predict.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Ecology and Evolution (IEE)
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Ecology and Evolution (IEE) > Community Ecology

UniBE Contributor:

Bacher, Sven and Nentwig, Wolfgang

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
500 Science > 590 Animals (Zoology)
500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

ISSN:

0027-8424

Publisher:

National Academy of Sciences NAS

Language:

English

Submitter:

Alexander Strauss

Date Deposited:

08 May 2018 14:14

Last Modified:

04 Nov 2019 03:51

Publisher DOI:

10.1073/pnas.1719429115

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.116222

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/116222

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback