Cardiac electrophysiology catheters for electrophysiological assessments of the lower urinary tract—A proof of concept ex vivo study in viable ureters

Häberlin, Andreas; Schürch, Klaus; Niederhauser, Thomas; Sweda, Romy; Schneider, Marc Philipp; Obrist, Dominik; Burkhard, Fiona C.; Clavica, Francesco (2018). Cardiac electrophysiology catheters for electrophysiological assessments of the lower urinary tract—A proof of concept ex vivo study in viable ureters. Neurourology and urodynamics, 38(1), pp. 87-96. Wiley-Liss 10.1002/nau.23816

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Abstract Aims To explore the feasibility of minimally invasive catheter‐based electrophysiology studies in the urinary tract. This is a well‐known method used in cardiology to investigate and treat arrhythmias. Methods We developed an experimental platform which allows electrophysiological recordings with cardiac catheters and conventional needle electrodes in ex vivo pig ureters. The action potential was triggered by a stimulating electrode. We considered 13 porcine ureters (freshly collected and harvested in organ bath), 7 of which were used to optimize the setup and define the stimulation parameters; we performed the recordings in the remaining six ureters. The electrical propagation of the generated action potential was tracked with multiple sensing electrodes, from which propagation directions, velocities, refractory periods, and pacing thresholds were extracted. Results We recorded propagating electrical activity in four ureters using needle electrodes and in two ureters using cardiac catheters. Propagation velocities for forward direction (from kidney to bladder) derived by the two methods were similar (15.1 ± 2.6 mm/s for cardiac catheters, 15.6 ± 2.3 mm/s for needle recordings). Pacing thresholds, activation patters, and refractory times were provided for the ureteric smooth muscle. Retrograde propagations and corresponding velocities were also observed and measured. Conclusions This study is a proof‐of‐concept showing that electrical activity can be measured “from the inside” of urinary cavities using catheters and that obtained results are comparable with the more invasive needle recordings. Catheter‐based electrophysiology may allow, in the clinical setting, for: i) a more differentiated understanding of urological disorders such as overactive bladder and ii) new therapeutic approaches (e.g., targeted tissue ablation).

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Urologie
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Urologie

10 Strategic Research Centers > ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research > ARTORG Center - Cardiovascular Engineering (CVE)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Dermatology, Urology, Rheumatology, Nephrology, Osteoporosis (DURN) > Clinic of Urology
10 Strategic Research Centers > ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Kardiologie
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Kardiologie

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Cardiovascular Disorders (DHGE) > Clinic of Cardiology

UniBE Contributor:

Häberlin, Andreas; Schürch, Klaus; Niederhauser, Thomas; Sweda, Romy; Schneider, Marc Philipp; Obrist, Dominik; Burkhard, Fiona C. and Clavica, Francesco

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
600 Technology > 620 Engineering

ISSN:

0733-2467

Publisher:

Wiley-Liss

Language:

English

Submitter:

Francesco Clavica

Date Deposited:

25 Sep 2018 10:31

Last Modified:

30 Dec 2018 02:32

Publisher DOI:

10.1002/nau.23816

PubMed ID:

30178576

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.120103

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/120103

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