Mental Illness Has a Negative Impact on Weight Loss in Bariatric Patients: a 4-Year Follow-up.

Müller, Martin; Nett, Philipp C.; Borbély, Yves Michael; Buri, Caroline; Stirnimann, Guido; Laederach, Kurt; Kröll, Dino (2019). Mental Illness Has a Negative Impact on Weight Loss in Bariatric Patients: a 4-Year Follow-up. Journal of gastrointestinal surgery, 23(2), pp. 232-238. Springer-Verlag 10.1007/s11605-018-3903-x

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BACKGROUND Mental health disorders are highly prevalent among bariatric surgery patients. Bariatric surgery induces weight loss with continuous health improvements. However, long-term follow-up data on weight loss and quality of life data of patients who have a mental illness after bariatric surgery are scarce, and it is not clear whether mental illness is associated with more pronounced weight regain. The aim was to investigate the impact of preoperative mental illness on the course of long-term weight changes after bariatric surgery. METHODS Patients with sleeve gastrectomy (SG) or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) between 2005 and 2013 with a follow-up of at least 3 years were included. The study population was divided into two groups: patients with mental illness (MI) and patients without (No-MI). Weight loss outcomes over time were compared using mixed models up to 4 years after surgery. RESULTS In total, 254 patients (RYGB 61.0%, SG 39%) were included. The distribution of baseline characteristics was similar between the MI (n = 108) and No-MI groups (n = 146). The most prevalent mental illness was depressive disorder (63.9%). In the MI group, the percent of total weight loss (%TWL) was significantly smaller over the study period. After 36 months, the predicted mean group-difference of %TWL was 4.6% (95% CI 1.9, 7.2; p = 0.001), and the predicted odds ratio for weight regain was 4.9 (95% CI 1.6, 15.1) for patients in the MI group. CONCLUSION Preoperative mental illness leads to lower long-term weight loss and an increased risk of weight regain after bariatric surgery.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Visceral Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Clinical Nutrition
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > University Emergency Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Hepatologie
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Hepatologie

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Hepatology

UniBE Contributor:

Müller, Martin; Nett, Philipp C.; Borbély, Yves Michael; Buri, Caroline; Stirnimann, Guido; Laederach, Kurt and Kröll, Dino

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1091-255X

Publisher:

Springer-Verlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Thi Thao Anh Pham

Date Deposited:

11 Dec 2018 14:48

Last Modified:

21 Feb 2019 01:31

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s11605-018-3903-x

PubMed ID:

30091038

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Bariatric surgery Depression Long-term Mental illness Weight change Weight loss outcomes

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.120317

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/120317

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