Adrenal, thyroid and gonadal axes are affected at high altitude.

von Wolff, M.; Nakas, Christos T.; Wolf, Marlene; Merz, Tobias; Hilty, M P; Veldhuis, J D; Huber, A R; Pichler Hefti, Jacqueline Renée (2018). Adrenal, thyroid and gonadal axes are affected at high altitude. Endocrine Connections, 7(10), pp. 1081-1089. BioScientifica 10.1530/EC-18-0242

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Humans cannot live at very high altitude for reasons, which are not completely understood. Since these reasons are not restricted to cardiorespiratory changes alone, changes in the endocrine system might also be involved. Therefore, hormonal changes during prolonged hypobaric hypoxia were comprehensively assessed to determine effects of altitude and hypoxia on stress, thyroid and gonadal hypothalamus-pituitary hormone axes. Twenty-one male and 19 female participants were examined repetitively during a high-altitude expedition. Cortisol, prolactin, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), fT4 and fT3 and in males follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and total testosterone were analysed as well as parameters of hypoxemia, such as SaO2 and paO2 at 550 m (baseline) (n = 40), during ascent at 4844 m (n = 38), 6022 m (n = 31) and 7050 m (n = 13), at 4844 m (n = 29) after acclimatization and after the expedition (n = 38). Correlation analysis of hormone concentrations with oxygen parameters and with altitude revealed statistical association in most cases only with altitude. Adrenal, thyroid and gonadal axes were affected by increasing altitude. Adrenal axis and prolactin were first supressed at 4844 m and then activated with increasing altitude; thyroid and gonadal axes were directly activated or suppressed respectively with increasing altitude. Acclimatisation at 4844 m led to normalization of adrenal and gonadal but not of thyroid axes. In conclusion, acclimatization partly leads to a normalization of the adrenal, thyroid and gonadal axes at around 5000 m. However, at higher altitude, endocrine dysregulation is pronounced and might contribute to the physical degradation found at high altitude.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Institute of Clinical Chemistry
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > Clinic of Intensive Care
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Pneumology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Gynaecology

UniBE Contributor:

von Wolff, Michael; Nakas, Christos T.; Wolf, Marlene; Merz, Tobias and Pichler Hefti, Jacqueline Renée

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

2049-3614

Publisher:

BioScientifica

Language:

English

Submitter:

Pascale Bodenmann

Date Deposited:

06 Feb 2019 13:40

Last Modified:

18 Jul 2019 14:07

Publisher DOI:

10.1530/EC-18-0242

PubMed ID:

30352395

Uncontrolled Keywords:

TSH altitude cortisol fT3 fT4 follicle-stimulation hormone hypobaric hypoxia luteinizing hormone prolactin testosterone

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.122371

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/122371

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