Mortality and morbidity in community-acquired sepsis in European pediatric intensive care units: a prospective cohort study from the European Childhood Life-threatening Infectious Disease Study (EUCLIDS).

Boeddha, Navin P; Schlapbach, Luregn Jan; Driessen, Gertjan J; Herberg, Jethro A; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Cebey-López, Miriam; Klobassa, Daniela S; Philipsen, Ria; de Groot, Ronald; Inwald, David P; Nadel, Simon; Paulus, Stéphane; Pinnock, Eleanor; Secka, Fatou; Anderson, Suzanne T; Agbeko, Rachel S; Berger, Christoph; Fink, Colin G; Carrol, Enitan D; Zenz, Werner; ... (2018). Mortality and morbidity in community-acquired sepsis in European pediatric intensive care units: a prospective cohort study from the European Childhood Life-threatening Infectious Disease Study (EUCLIDS). Critical care, 22(1), p. 143. BioMed Central 10.1186/s13054-018-2052-7

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BACKGROUND Sepsis is one of the main reasons for non-elective admission to pediatric intensive care units (PICUs), but little is known about determinants influencing outcome. We characterized children admitted with community-acquired sepsis to European PICUs and studied risk factors for mortality and disability. METHODS Data were collected within the collaborative Seventh Framework Programme (FP7)-funded EUCLIDS study, which is a prospective multicenter cohort study aiming to evaluate genetic determinants of susceptibility and/or severity in sepsis. This report includes 795 children admitted with community-acquired sepsis to 52 PICUs from seven European countries between July 2012 and January 2016. The primary outcome measure was in-hospital death. Secondary outcome measures were PICU-free days censured at day 28, hospital length of stay, and disability. Independent predictors were identified by multivariate regression analysis. RESULTS Patients most commonly presented clinically with sepsis without a source (n = 278, 35%), meningitis/encephalitis (n = 182, 23%), or pneumonia (n = 149, 19%). Of 428 (54%) patients with confirmed bacterial infection, Neisseria meningitidis (n = 131, 31%) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 78, 18%) were the main pathogens. Mortality was 6% (51/795), increasing to 10% in the presence of septic shock (45/466). Of the survivors, 31% were discharged with disability, including 24% of previously healthy children who survived with disability. Mortality and disability were independently associated with S. pneumoniae infections (mortality OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.1-16.0, P = 0.04; disability OR 5.4, 95% CI 1.8-15.8, P < 0.01) and illness severity as measured by Pediatric Index of Mortality (PIM2) score (mortality OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.3-6.1, P < 0.01; disability OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.8-6.4, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Despite widespread immunization campaigns, invasive bacterial disease remains responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality in critically ill children in high-income countries. Almost one third of sepsis survivors admitted to the PICU were discharged with some disability. More research is required to delineate the long-term outcome of pediatric sepsis and to identify interventional targets. Our findings emphasize the importance of improved early sepsis-recognition programs to address the high burden of disease.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Schlapbach, Luregn Jan

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1364-8535

Publisher:

BioMed Central

Funders:

[103] European Commission FP7
[4] Swiss National Science Foundation
[UNSPECIFIED] Swiss Society of Intensive Care
[24] Gottfried und Julia Bangerter- Rhyner Stiftung
[72] Vinetum Foundation
[UNSPECIFIED] Foundation for the Health of Children and Adolescents

Language:

English

Submitter:

Philipp Agyeman

Date Deposited:

19 Feb 2019 16:43

Last Modified:

24 Feb 2019 02:33

Publisher DOI:

10.1186/s13054-018-2052-7

PubMed ID:

29855385

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Bacteremia Meningococcal infections Morbidity Mortality Pneumococcal infections

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.123839

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/123839

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