Metabolic profiling of listeria rhombencephalitis in small ruminants by 1 H high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

Precht, Maria Christina; Diserens, Gaëlle; Vermathen, Martina; Oevermann, Anna; Lauper, Josiane; Vermathen, Peter (2018). Metabolic profiling of listeria rhombencephalitis in small ruminants by 1 H high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. NMR in biomedicine, 31(12), e4023. Wiley Interscience 10.1002/nbm.4023

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Listeria rhombencephalitis is caused by infection with Listeria monocytogenes and is associated with a high mortality rate in humans and ruminants. Little is known about the metabolic changes associated with neurolisteriosis in particular and infectious central nervous system (CNS) diseases in general. The purpose of our study was to investigate the metabolic changes associated with listeria rhombencephalitis in small ruminants (goats and sheep) as a model for inflammatory CNS disease by 1 H high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (1 H HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy of brain biopsies obtained from the brainstem and thalamus. Statistical analysis revealed distinct differences in the metabolic profile of brainstem biopsies, the primary location of listeria rhombencephalitis with moderate or severe inflammatory changes. N-Acetylaspartate (NAA), N-acetylaspartylglutamate, choline, myo-inositol and scyllo-inositol were decreased, and glycine, phosphocholine, taurine and lactate were increased, in the diseased group (n = 13) in comparison with the control group (n = 12). In the thalamus, which showed no or only mild inflammatory changes in the majority of animals, no statistically significant metabolic changes were observed. However, trends for metabolic alterations were partly the same as those found in the brainstem, including NAA, choline and lactate. This may be an indicator of metabolic changes occurring in the early stages of the disease. Therefore, further research with a larger number of animals is needed to evaluate the presence of subtle metabolic changes associated with mild inflammatory changes in the thalamus. In conclusion, 1 H HR-MAS NMR investigation of listeria rhombencephalitis identified brain metabolite changes, offering new insights into the disease pathophysiology.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine (DRNN) > Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology > DCR Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Methodology (AMSM)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > NeuroCenter
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Clinical Radiology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Experimental Clinical Research
08 Faculty of Science > Departement of Chemistry and Biochemistry
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > Forschungsbereich Pavillon 52
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences (GCB)

UniBE Contributor:

Precht, Maria Christina; Diserens, Gaëlle; Vermathen, Martina; Oevermann, Anna; Lauper, Josiane and Vermathen, Peter

Subjects:

500 Science > 540 Chemistry
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0952-3480

Publisher:

Wiley Interscience

Language:

English

Submitter:

Maria Christina Precht

Date Deposited:

28 Mar 2019 11:03

Last Modified:

23 Oct 2019 12:36

Publisher DOI:

10.1002/nbm.4023

PubMed ID:

30328643

Uncontrolled Keywords:

HR-MAS; Listeria monocytogenes; goats; neurolisteriosis; sheep

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.124019

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/124019

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