Association of fecal calprotectin concentrations with disease severity, response to treatment, and other biomarkers in dogs with chronic inflammatory enteropathies.

Heilmann, Romy M; Berghoff, Nora; Mansell, Joanne; Grützner, Niels; Parnell, Nolie K; Gurtner, Corinne; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M (2018). Association of fecal calprotectin concentrations with disease severity, response to treatment, and other biomarkers in dogs with chronic inflammatory enteropathies. Journal of veterinary internal medicine, 32(2), pp. 679-692. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/jvim.15065

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BACKGROUND Calprotectin is a marker of inflammation, but its clinical utility in dogs with chronic inflammatory enteropathies (CIE) is unknown. OBJECTIVE Evaluation of fecal calprotectin in dogs with biopsy-confirmed CIE. ANIMALS 127 dogs. METHODS Prospective case-control study. Dogs were assigned a canine chronic enteropathy clinical activity index (CCECAI) score, and histologic lesions severity was assessed. Fecal calprotectin, fecal S100A12, and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Food- or antibiotic-responsive cases (FRE/ARE, n = 13) were distinguished from steroid-/immunosuppressant-responsive or -refractory cases (SRE/IRE, n = 20). Clinical response to treatment in SRE/IRE dogs was classified as complete remission (CR), partial response (PR), or no response (NR). RESULTS Fecal calprotectin correlated with CCECAI (ρ = 0.27, P = .0065) and fecal S100A12 (ρ = 0.90, P < .0001), some inflammatory criteria, and cumulative inflammation scores, but not serum CRP (ρ = 0.16, P = .12). Dogs with SRE/IRE had higher fecal calprotectin concentrations (median: 2.0 μg/g) than FRE/ARE dogs (median: 1.4 μg/g), and within the SRE/IRE group, dogs with PR/NR had higher fecal calprotectin (median: 37.0 μg/g) than dogs with CR (median: 1.6 μg/g). However, both differences did not reach statistical significance (both P = .10). A fecal calprotectin ≥15.2 μg/g separated both groups with 80% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 28%-100%) and 75% specificity (95%CI: 43%-95%). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE Fecal calprotectin could be a useful surrogate marker of disease severity in dogs with CIE, but larger longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate its utility in predicting the response to treatment.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Host-Pathogen Interaction
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Animal Pathology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)

UniBE Contributor:

Gurtner, Corinne

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
500 Science > 590 Animals (Zoology)
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0891-6640

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Achim Braun Parham

Date Deposited:

29 May 2019 14:27

Last Modified:

24 Oct 2019 14:12

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/jvim.15065

PubMed ID:

29460444

Uncontrolled Keywords:

antibiotic-responsive enteropathy biomarker calgranulin canine food-responsive enteropathy inflammatory bowel disease

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.127548

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/127548

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