Primary non-communicable disease prevention and communication barriers of deaf sign language users: a qualitative study.

Pinilla, Severin; Walther, Sebastian; Hofmeister, Arnd; Huwendiek, Sören (2019). Primary non-communicable disease prevention and communication barriers of deaf sign language users: a qualitative study. International journal for equity in health, 18(1), p. 71. BioMed Central 10.1186/s12939-019-0976-4

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BACKGROUND Deaf sign language users have lower health literacy and poorer access to non-communicable disease prevention information as compared to the general population. The aim was to explore disease concepts embedded in signs, primary non-communicable disease prevention behaviour and communication barriers among members of a deaf community. METHODS A qualitative study with a social constructivist approach was conducted to explore perspectives of deaf sign language users.15 individuals, two with and 13 without history of diabetes were recruited for semi-structured in-depth interviews in sign language at a deaf community center. The interviews were video-recorded, translated and analyzed using thematic content analysis. RESULTS Diabetes as one of the main non-communicable diseases is conceptualized differently in the manual component of signs depending on how deaf sign language users construct diabetes pathophysiologically. The disease conceptualization is not represented in the mouthing component. Health information seeking behavior varies among deaf sign language users and depends on their individual spoken and written language literacy. Overcoming communication barriers is key for developing an understanding of diabetes and other non-communicable disease prevention activities. CONCLUSIONS To develop barrier-free and inclusive non-communicable disease and diabetes prevention strategies for deaf sign language users, health professionals need to pay attention to sign language specific linguistic concepts. More studies are needed to better understand the specific needs of sign language users and effective strategies in health promotion contexts for sign language users.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute for Medical Education > Assessment and Evaluation Unit (AAE)
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Translational Research Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute for Medical Education

UniBE Contributor:

Pinilla, Severin; Walther, Sebastian and Huwendiek, Sören

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1475-9276

Publisher:

BioMed Central

Language:

English

Submitter:

Sebastian Walther

Date Deposited:

28 Aug 2019 10:38

Last Modified:

23 Oct 2019 07:12

Publisher DOI:

10.1186/s12939-019-0976-4

PubMed ID:

31092251

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Communication Deaf Diabetes Non-communicable diseases Prevention Sign language

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.132649

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/132649

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