The Contribution of the Left Phrenic Nerve to Innervation of the Esophagogastric Junction

Haenssgen, Kati; Herrmann, Gudrun; Draeger, Annette; Essig, Manfred; Djonov, Valentin (2020). The Contribution of the Left Phrenic Nerve to Innervation of the Esophagogastric Junction. Clinical anatomy, 33(2), pp. 265-274. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1002/ca.23502

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The contribution of the left phrenic nerve to innervation of the esophagogastric junction. The esophagogastric junction is part of the barrier preventing gastroesophageal reflux. We have investigated the contribution of the phrenic nerves to innervation of the esophagogastric junction in humans and piglets by dissecting 30 embalmed human specimens and 14 piglets. Samples were microdissected and nerves were stained and examined by light and electron microscopy. In 76.6% of the human specimens, the left phrenic nerve participated in the innervation of the esophagogastric junction by forming a neural network together with the celiac plexus (46.6%) or by sending off a distinct phrenic branch, which joined the anterior vagal trunk (20%). Distinct left phrenic branches were always accompanied by small branches of the left inferior phrenic artery. In 10% there were indirect connections with a distinct phrenic nerve branch joining the celiac ganglion, from which celiac plexus branches to the esophagogastric junction emerged. Morphological examination of phrenic branches revealed strong similarities to autonomic celiac plexus branches. There was no contribution of the left phrenic nerve or accompanying arteries from the caudal phrenic artery in any of the piglets. The right phrenic nerve made no contribution in any of the human or piglet samples. We conclude that the left phrenic nerve in humans contributes to the innervation of the esophagogastric junction by providing ancillary autonomic nerve fibers. Experimental studies of the innervation in pigs should consider that neither of the phrenic nerves was found to contribute. Clin. Anat., 2019.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

09 Interdisciplinary Units > Microscopy Imaging Center (MIC)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Anatomy > Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Anatomy > Topographical and Clinical Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Anatomy > Cell Biology

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences (GCB)

UniBE Contributor:

Haenssgen, Kati; Herrmann, Gudrun; Draeger, Annette and Djonov, Valentin Georgiev

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0897-3806

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Gudrun Herrmann-Engelmann

Date Deposited:

03 Jan 2020 10:13

Last Modified:

09 Feb 2020 01:34

Publisher DOI:

10.1002/ca.23502

PubMed ID:

31625208

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.136730

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/136730

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