A persistent memory advantage is specific to grapheme-colour synaesthesia

Lunke, Katrin; Meier, Beat (2020). A persistent memory advantage is specific to grapheme-colour synaesthesia. Scientific reports, 10(3484), pp. 1-8. Springer Nature 10.1038/s41598-020-60388-6

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For people with synaesthesia ordinary stimuli such as digits or letters induce concurrent experiences such as colours. Synaesthesia is associated with a memory advantage and the aim of this study was to investigate whether this advantage persists across time. We tested recognition memory of four different types of synaesthesia with different inducer-concurrent pairings across two sessions with a one-year retention interval. In the study phase, participants learned three kinds of stimuli (i.e., related to their inducer, related to their concurrent, or synaesthesia-unrelated): music, words and colours. Recognition memory was tested after one hour and after one year. After one hour, grapheme-colour and grapheme-colour-and-sound-colour synaesthetes showed synaesthesia-specific advantages. After one year, only grapheme-colour synaesthetes still showed an advantage. The results imply that a benefit through enhanced colour-processing is particularly strong and that synaesthesia can lead to a long-lasting memory benefit.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology, Perception and Methodology

UniBE Contributor:

Lunke, Katrin and Meier, Beat

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology

ISSN:

2045-2322

Publisher:

Springer Nature

Funders:

[4] Swiss National Science Foundation

Projects:

[UNSPECIFIED] Specificity and longevity of memory advantages in synaesthesia

Language:

English

Submitter:

Beat Meier

Date Deposited:

09 Mar 2020 13:59

Last Modified:

09 Mar 2020 14:09

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/s41598-020-60388-6

PubMed ID:

32103070

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.141142

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/141142

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