Prevalence and management of chronic insomnia in Swiss primary care: Cross-sectional data from the "Sentinella" practice-based research network.

Maire, Micheline; Linder, Stefanie; Dvořák, Charles; Merlo, Christoph; Essig, Stefan; Tal, Kali; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Syrogiannouli, Lamprini; Duss, Simone B.; Heinzer, Raphael; Nissen, Christoph; Bassetti, Claudio L.A.; Auer, Reto (2020). Prevalence and management of chronic insomnia in Swiss primary care: Cross-sectional data from the "Sentinella" practice-based research network. (In Press). Journal of sleep research, e13121. Wiley 10.1111/jsr.13121

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We investigated the prevalence and treatment of patients with chronic insomnia presenting to Swiss primary care physicians (PCPs) part of "Sentinella", a nationwide practice-based research network. Each PCP consecutively asked 40 patients if they had sleep complaints, documented frequency, duration, comorbidities, and reported ongoing treatment. We analysed data of 63% (83/132) of the PCPs invited. The PCPs asked 76% (2,432/3,216) of included patients about their sleep (51% female); 31% (761/2,432) of these had had insomnia symptoms; 36% (875/2,432) had current insomnia symptoms; 11% (269/2,432) met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) criteria for chronic insomnia (61% female). In all, 75% (201/269) of patients with chronic insomnia had comorbidities, with 49% (99/201) reporting depression. Chronic insomnia was treated in 78% (209/269); 70% (188/268) took medication, 38% (102/268) benzodiazepines or benzodiazepine receptor agonists, 32% (86/268) took antidepressants. Only 1% (three of 268) had been treated with cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). A third of patients presenting for a non-urgent visit in Swiss primary care reported insomnia symptoms and 11% met the DSM-5 criteria for chronic insomnia. Hypnotics were the most common treatment, but almost no patients received first-line CBT-I. Reducing the burden of insomnia depends on disseminating knowledge about and access to CBT-I, and encouraging PCPs to discuss it with and offer it as a first-line treatment to patients with chronic insomnia.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute of General Practice and Primary Care (BIHAM)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology

UniBE Contributor:

Maire, Micheline; Linder, Stefanie; Tal, Kali; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Syrogiannouli, Lamprini; Duss, Simone; Bassetti, Claudio and Auer, Reto

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

0962-1105

Publisher:

Wiley

Language:

English

Submitter:

Andrea Flükiger-Flückiger

Date Deposited:

30 Jun 2020 18:49

Last Modified:

09 Jul 2020 11:51

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/jsr.13121

PubMed ID:

32588519

Uncontrolled Keywords:

chronic insomnia cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia epidemiology primary care sleep

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.144895

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/144895

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