Genetic variation of keel and long bone skeletal properties for 5 lines of laying hens

Candelotto, L.; Stadelmann, M.; Gebhardt-Henrich, S. G.; Stratmann, A.; van de Braak, T.G.H.; Guggisberg, D.; Zysset, Philippe; Toscano, Michael J. (2020). Genetic variation of keel and long bone skeletal properties for 5 lines of laying hens. Journal of applied poultry research, 29(4), pp. 937-946. Elsevier 10.1016/j.japr.2020.09.004

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Fractures to the keel bone is one of the greatest problems facing the laying hen industry. With most severe effects observed in non-cage housing, frequencies are expected to dramatically increase as the industry continues transitioning away from battery cages. Incidences within commercial systems are well documented, where the main cause is believed to be high egg production and the associated need for calcium drawing on endogenous reserves (i.e., bone) leaving bone weakened and prone to fracture. The current work sought to characterize various bone mineral and biomechanical properties of 5 distinct purebred or crossbred laying hen lines (3 commercial: Bovans Brown, Dekalb White, and Institut de Sélection Animale Dual Brown; 2 non-commercial: Experimental Brown and Experimental White), following previous work that demonstrated differences in susceptibility to keel fracture using an ex vivo impact testing apparatus. The keel was then removed to undergo analysis by computer tomography; the humerus and tibia were also removed for biomechanical testing. The keel bone mineral density and moment of area correlated moderately with hen weight and susceptibility to fracture. The biomechanical properties of the tibia, but not the humerus, showed a strong relationship with hen weight. One commercial genetic line (Dekalb White) with a high susceptibility to fracture exhibited a mean tibia strength below the value expected from its mean weight. Our results suggest that for the purebred or crossbred lines other than Dekalb White, rather than properties of bone, lower mean weight may imply higher levels of activity, higher risk of collisions, and lower soft tissue protection that reflect greater susceptibility to keel fracture.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

10 Strategic Research Centers > ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research > ARTORG Center - Musculoskeletal Biomechanics
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute for Surgical Technology & Biomechanics ISTB [discontinued]
05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Veterinary Public Health / Herd Health Management
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Veterinary Public Health Institute > Animal Welfare Division
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Veterinary Public Health Institute

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences (GCB)

UniBE Contributor:

Candelotto, Laura; Stadelmann, Marc André; Gebhardt, Sabine; Stratmann, Ariane; Zysset, Philippe and Toscano, Michael Jeffrey

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1056-6171

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Lilian Karin Smith-Wirth

Date Deposited:

26 Oct 2020 17:25

Last Modified:

26 Nov 2020 01:33

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.japr.2020.09.004

Uncontrolled Keywords:

laying hen bone health keel fracture strength

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.147284

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/147284

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