Effect of recent and ancient inbreeding on production and fertility traits in Canadian Holsteins.

Makanjuola, Bayode O.; Maltecca, Christian; Miglior, Filippo; Schenkel, Flavio S.; Baes, Christine F. (2020). Effect of recent and ancient inbreeding on production and fertility traits in Canadian Holsteins. BMC Genomics, 21(1), p. 605. BioMed Central 10.1186/s12864-020-07031-w

[img]
Preview
Text
s12864-020-07031-w.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (1MB) | Preview

BACKGROUND

Phenotypic performances of livestock animals decline with increasing levels of inbreeding, however, the noticeable decline known as inbreeding depression, may not be due only to the total level of inbreeding, but rather could be distinctly associated with more recent or more ancient inbreeding. Therefore, splitting inbreeding into different age classes could help in assessing detrimental effects of different ages of inbreeding. Hence, this study sought to investigate the effect of recent and ancient inbreeding on production and fertility traits in Canadian Holstein cattle with both pedigree and genomic records. Furthermore, inbreeding coefficients were estimated using traditional pedigree measure (FPED) and genomic measures using segment based (FROH) and marker-by-marker (FGRM) based approaches.

RESULTS

Inbreeding depression was found for all production and most fertility traits, for example, every 1% increase in FPED, FROH and FGRM was observed to cause a - 44.71, - 40.48 and - 48.72 kg reduction in 305-day milk yield (MY), respectively. Similarly, an extension in first service to conception (FSTC) of 0.29, 0.24 and 0.31 day in heifers was found for every 1% increase in FPED, FROH and FGRM, respectively. Fertility traits that did not show significant depression were observed to move in an unfavorable direction over time. Splitting both pedigree and genomic inbreeding into age classes resulted in recent age classes showing more detrimental inbreeding effects, while more distant age classes caused more favorable effects. For example, a - 1.56 kg loss in 305-day protein yield (PY) was observed for every 1% increase in the most recent pedigree age class, whereas a 1.33 kg gain was found per 1% increase in the most distant pedigree age class.

CONCLUSIONS

Inbreeding depression was observed for production and fertility traits. In general, recent inbreeding had unfavorable effects, while ancestral inbreeding had favorable effects. Given that more negative effects were estimated from recent inbreeding when compared to ancient inbreeding suggests that recent inbreeding should be the primary focus of selection programs. Also, further work to identify specific recent homozygous regions negatively associated with phenotypic traits could be investigated.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Institute of Genetics
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)

UniBE Contributor:

Baes, Christine Francoise

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
500 Science > 590 Animals (Zoology)
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

1471-2164

Publisher:

BioMed Central

Language:

English

Submitter:

Christine Francoise Baes

Date Deposited:

11 Nov 2020 11:17

Last Modified:

15 Nov 2020 02:45

Publisher DOI:

10.1186/s12864-020-07031-w

PubMed ID:

32873253

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Inbreeding depression Pedigree and genomic inbreeding Recent and ancient inbreeding

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.147822

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/147822

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback