In Silico Comparison Shows that the Pan-Genome of a Dairy-Related Bacterial Culture Collection Covers Most Reactions Annotated to Human Microbiomes.

Roder, Thomas; Wüthrich, Daniel; Bär, Cornelia; Sattari, Zahra; Ah, Ueli von; Ronchi, Francesca; Macpherson, Andrew; Ganal-Vonarburg, Stephanie C.; Bruggmann, Rémy; Vergères, Guy (2020). In Silico Comparison Shows that the Pan-Genome of a Dairy-Related Bacterial Culture Collection Covers Most Reactions Annotated to Human Microbiomes. Microorganisms, 8(7) MDPI 10.3390/microorganisms8070966

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The diversity of the human microbiome is positively associated with human health. However, this diversity is endangered by Westernized dietary patterns that are characterized by a decreased nutrient variety. Diversity might potentially be improved by promoting dietary patterns rich in microbial strains. Various collections of bacterial cultures resulting from a century of dairy research are readily available worldwide, and could be exploited to contribute towards this end. We have conducted a functional in silico analysis of the metagenome of 24 strains, each representing one of the species in a bacterial culture collection composed of 626 sequenced strains, and compared the pathways potentially covered by this metagenome to the intestinal metagenome of four healthy, although overweight, humans. Remarkably, the pan-genome of the 24 strains covers 89% of the human gut microbiome's annotated enzymatic reactions. Furthermore, the dairy microbial collection covers biological pathways, such as methylglyoxal degradation, sulfate reduction, g-aminobutyric (GABA) acid degradation and salicylate degradation, which are differently covered among the four subjects and are involved in a range of cardiometabolic, intestinal, and neurological disorders. We conclude that microbial culture collections derived from dairy research have the genomic potential to complement and restore functional redundancy in human microbiomes.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Gastroenterology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Gastroenterologie / Mukosale Immunologie
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Gastroenterologie / Mukosale Immunologie

UniBE Contributor:

Roder, Thomas; Sattari Najafabadi, Zahra; Ronchi, Francesca; Macpherson, Andrew; Ganal-Vonarburg, Stephanie Christine and Bruggmann, Rémy

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

2076-2607

Publisher:

MDPI

Language:

English

Submitter:

Rahel Fuhrer

Date Deposited:

15 Dec 2020 17:26

Last Modified:

15 Dec 2020 17:26

Publisher DOI:

10.3390/microorganisms8070966

PubMed ID:

32605102

Uncontrolled Keywords:

dairy microbiome diversity health human gut microbiome

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.148428

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/148428

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