Cytokine and lipid metabolome effects of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid in critically ill patients with systemic inflammation: a pilot, feasibility, multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

Cioccari, Luca; Luethi, Nora; Duong, Thy; Ryan, Eileen; Cutuli, Salvatore L; Lloyd-Donald, Patryck; Eastwood, Glenn M; Peck, Leah; Young, Helen; Vaara, Suvi T; French, Craig J; Orford, Neil; Dwivedi, Jyotsna; Lankadeva, Yugeesh R; Bailey, Michael; Reid, Gavin E; Bellomo, Rinaldo (2020). Cytokine and lipid metabolome effects of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid in critically ill patients with systemic inflammation: a pilot, feasibility, multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Critical care and resuscitation, 22(3), pp. 227-236. College of Intensive Care Medicine of Australia and New Zealand

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OBJECTIVE

The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a dysregulated response that contributes to critical illness. Adjunctive acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) treatment may offer beneficial effects by increasing the synthesis of specialised proresolving mediators (a subset of polyunsaturated fatty acid-derived lipid mediators).

DESIGN

Pilot, feasibility, multicentre, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

SETTING

Four interdisciplinary intensive care units (ICUs) in Australia.

PARTICIPANTS

Critically ill patients with SIRS.

INTERVENTIONS

ASA 100 mg 12-hourly or placebo, administered within 24 hours of ICU admission and continued until ICU day 7, discharge or death, whichever came first.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Interleukin-6 (IL-6) serum concentration at 48 hours after randomisation and, in a prespecified subgroup of patients, serum lipid mediator concentrations measured by mass spectrometry.

RESULTS

The trial was discontinued in December 2017 due to slow recruitment and after the inclusion of 48 patients. Compared with placebo, ASA did not decrease IL-6 serum concentration at 48 hours. In the 32 patients with analysis of lipid mediators, low-dose ASA increased the concentration of 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, a proresolving precursor of lipoxin A4, and reduced the concentration of the proinflammatory cytochrome P-dependent mediators 17-HETE (hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid), 18-HETE and 20-HETE. In the eicosapentaenoic acid pathway, ASA significantly increased the concentration of the anti-inflammatory mediators 17,18-DiHETE (dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid) and 14,15-DiHETE.

CONCLUSIONS

In ICU patients with SIRS, low-dose ASA did not significantly alter serum IL-6 concentrations, but it did affect plasma concentrations of certain lipid mediators. The ability to measure lipid mediators in clinical samples and to monitor the effect of ASA on their levels unlocks a potential area of biological investigation in critical care.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN 12614001165673).

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > Clinic of Intensive Care

UniBE Contributor:

Cioccari, Luca (A)

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1441-2772

Publisher:

College of Intensive Care Medicine of Australia and New Zealand

Language:

English

Submitter:

Isabelle Arni

Date Deposited:

25 Nov 2020 14:22

Last Modified:

29 Mar 2023 23:37

PubMed ID:

32900329

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.148500

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/148500

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