Environmental Factors Shape Sleep EEG Connectivity During Early Adolescence

Markovic, Andjela; Kaess, Michael; Tarokh, Leila (2020). Environmental Factors Shape Sleep EEG Connectivity During Early Adolescence. Cerebral cortex, 30(11), pp. 5780-5791. Oxford University Press 10.1093/cercor/bhaa151

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Quantifying the degree to which genetic and environmental factors shape brain network connectivity is critical to furthering our understanding of the developing human brain. Sleep, a state of sensory disengagement, provides a unique opportunity to study brain network activity noninvasively by means of sleep electroencephalography (EEG) coherence. We conducted a high-density sleep EEG study in monozygotic (MZ; n = 38; mean age = 12.46; 20 females) and dizygotic (DZ; n = 24; mean age = 12.50; 12 females) twins to assess the heritability of sleep EEG coherence in early adolescence-a period of significant brain rewiring. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate three latent factors: genes, environmental factors shared between twins and environmental factors unique to each twin. We found a strong contribution of unique environmental factors (66% of the variance) and moderate genetic influence (19% of the variance) on sleep EEG coherence across frequencies and sleep states. An exception to this was sleep spindle activity, an index of the thalamocortical network, which showed on average a genetic contribution of 48% across connections. Furthermore, we observed high intraindividual stability of coherence across two consecutive nights suggesting that despite only a modest genetic contribution, sleep EEG coherence is like a trait. Our findings in adolescent humans are in line with earlier findings in animals that show the primordial cerebral map and its connections are plastic and it is through interaction with the environment that the pattern of brain network connectivity is shaped. Therefore, even in twins living together, small differences in the environment may cascade into meaningful differences in brain connectivity

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Research Division

UniBE Contributor:

Markovic, Andjela; Kaess, Michael and Tarokh, Leila

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1047-3211

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Chantal Michel

Date Deposited:

25 Dec 2020 15:41

Last Modified:

25 Dec 2020 19:01

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/cercor/bhaa151

PubMed ID:

32488247

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/148970

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/148970

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