Prevalence and phylogeny of Chlamydiae and hemotropic mycoplasma species in captive and free-living bats.

Fritschi, Janine; Marti, Hanna; Seth-Smith, Helena M B; Aeby, Sébastien; Greub, Gilbert; Meli, Marina L; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Mühldorfer, Kristin; Stokar-Regenscheit, Nadine; Wiederkehr, Danja; Pilo, Paola; Van Den Broek, Peggy Rüegg-; Borel, Nicole (2020). Prevalence and phylogeny of Chlamydiae and hemotropic mycoplasma species in captive and free-living bats. BMC microbiology, 20(1), p. 182. BioMed Central 10.1186/s12866-020-01872-x

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BACKGROUND

Bats are hosts for a variety of microorganisms, however, little is known about the presence of Chlamydiales and hemotropic mycoplasmas. This study investigated 475 captive and free-living bats from Switzerland, Germany, and Costa Rica for Chlamydiales and hemotropic mycoplasmas by PCR to determine the prevalence and phylogeny of these organisms.

RESULTS

Screening for Chlamydiales resulted in a total prevalence of 31.4%. Positive samples originated from captive and free-living bats from all three countries. Sequencing of 15 samples allowed the detection of two phylogenetically distinct groups. These groups share sequence identities to Chlamydiaceae, and to Chlamydia-like organisms including Rhabdochlamydiaceae and unclassified Chlamydiales from environmental samples, respectively. PCR analysis for the presence of hemotropic mycoplasmas resulted in a total prevalence of 0.7%, comprising free-living bats from Germany and Costa Rica. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three sequences related to other unidentified mycoplasmas found in vampire bats and Chilean bats.

CONCLUSIONS

Bats can harbor Chlamydiales and hemotropic mycoplasmas and the newly described sequences in this study indicate that the diversity of these bacteria in bats is much larger than previously thought. Both, Chlamydiales and hemotropic mycoplasmas are not restricted to certain bat species or countries and captive and free-living bats can be colonized. In conclusion, bats represent another potential host or vector for novel, previously unidentified, Chlamydiales and hemotropic mycoplasmas.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Host-Pathogen Interaction
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Animal Pathology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology

UniBE Contributor:

Stokar von Neuforn, Nadine and Pilo, Paola

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
500 Science > 590 Animals (Zoology)
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

1471-2180

Publisher:

BioMed Central

Language:

English

Submitter:

Achim Braun Parham

Date Deposited:

07 Apr 2021 17:15

Last Modified:

11 Apr 2021 03:07

Publisher DOI:

10.1186/s12866-020-01872-x

PubMed ID:

32590949

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Bats Chlamydiales DNA Hemoplasmas Hemotropic mycoplasmas qPCR

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/153514

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/153514

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