Comparison of the effects of 7.2% hypertonic saline and 20% mannitol on electrolyte and acid-base variables in dogs with suspected intracranial hypertension.

Höhne, Sabrina N.; Yozova, Ivayla D; Vidondo, Beatriz; Adamik, Katja N. (2021). Comparison of the effects of 7.2% hypertonic saline and 20% mannitol on electrolyte and acid-base variables in dogs with suspected intracranial hypertension. Journal of veterinary internal medicine, 35(1), pp. 341-351. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/jvim.15973

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BACKGROUND

Hyperosmolar agents frequently are used to decrease intracranial pressure but their effects on electrolyte and acid-base variables have not been prospectively investigated.

OBJECTIVES

Compare duration and magnitude of changes in electrolyte and acid-base variables after hyperosmolar treatment.

ANIMALS

Twenty-eight client-owned dogs with intracranial hypertension caused by various pathologies.

METHODS

Prospective, randomized, nonblinded, experimental cohort study. Fifteen dogs received a single dose (4 mL/kg) of 7.2% hypertonic saline (HTS), 13 dogs received 20% mannitol (MAN) 1 g/kg IV. Electrolyte and acid-base variables were measured before (T0 ), and 5 (T5 ), 60 (T60 ), and 120 (T120 ) minutes after administration. Variables were compared between treatments and among time points within treatment groups.

RESULTS

Mean plasma sodium and chloride concentrations were higher after HTS than MAN at T5 (158 vs 141 mEq/L; 126 vs 109 mEq/L) and significant differences were maintained at all time points. After HTS, plasma sodium and chloride concentrations remained increased from T0 at all time points. After MAN, plasma sodium and chloride concentrations decreased at T5 , but these changes were not maintained at T60 and T120 . Plasma potassium concentration was lower at T5 after HTS compared with T0 (3.6 vs 3.9 mEq/L) and compared to MAN (3.6 vs 4.1 mEq/L). At T60 and T120 , plasma ionized calcium concentration was lower after HTS than MAN (1.2 vs 1.3 mmol/L). No significant differences were found in acid-base variables between treatments.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE

At the administered dose, dogs receiving HTS showed sustained increases in plasma sodium and chloride concentrations, whereas dogs receiving MAN showed transient decreases. Future studies should assess the effects of multiple doses of hyperosmolar agents on electrolyte and acid-base variables.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)

UniBE Contributor:

Höhne, Sabrina Nathalie; Vidondo, Beatriz and Adamik, Katja-Nicole

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture
500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
500 Science > 590 Animals (Zoology)
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0891-6640

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Achim Braun Parham

Date Deposited:

08 Apr 2021 14:23

Last Modified:

08 Apr 2021 14:23

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/jvim.15973

PubMed ID:

33236379

Uncontrolled Keywords:

canine hyperosmolar treatment metabolic traumatic brain injury

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/153517

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/153517

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