The Effects of Time-Restricted Eating versus Standard Dietary Advice on Weight, Metabolic Health and the Consumption of Processed Food: A Pragmatic Randomised Controlled Trial in Community-Based Adults.

Phillips, Nicholas Edward; Mareschal, Julie; Schwab, Nathalie; Manoogian, Emily N C; Borloz, Sylvie; Ostinelli, Giada; Gauthier-Jaques, Aude; Umwali, Sylvie; Rodriguez, Elena Gonzalez; Aeberli, Daniel; Hans, Didier; Panda, Satchidananda; Rodondi, Nicolas; Naef, Felix; Collet, Tinh-Hai (2021). The Effects of Time-Restricted Eating versus Standard Dietary Advice on Weight, Metabolic Health and the Consumption of Processed Food: A Pragmatic Randomised Controlled Trial in Community-Based Adults. Nutrients, 13(3), p. 1042. Molecular Diversity Preservation International MDPI 10.3390/nu13031042

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Weight loss is key to controlling the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and its components, i.e., central obesity, hypertension, prediabetes and dyslipidaemia. The goals of our study were two-fold. First, we characterised the relationships between eating duration, unprocessed and processed food consumption and metabolic health. During 4 weeks of observation, 213 adults used a smartphone application to record food and drink consumption, which was annotated for food processing levels following the NOVA classification. Low consumption of unprocessed food and low physical activity showed significant associations with multiple MS components. Second, in a pragmatic randomised controlled trial, we compared the metabolic benefits of 12 h time-restricted eating (TRE) to standard dietary advice (SDA) in 54 adults with an eating duration > 14 h and at least one MS component. After 6 months, those randomised to TRE lost 1.6% of initial body weight (SD 2.9, p = 0.01), compared to the absence of weight loss with SDA (-1.1%, SD 3.5, p = 0.19). There was no significant difference in weight loss between TRE and SDA (between-group difference -0.88%, 95% confidence interval -3.1 to 1.3, p = 0.43). Our results show the potential of smartphone records to predict metabolic health and highlight that further research is needed to improve individual responses to TRE such as a shorter eating window or its actual clock time.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Dermatology, Urology, Rheumatology, Nephrology, Osteoporosis (DURN) > Clinic of Rheumatology, Clinical Immunology and Allergology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM) > Clinic of General Internal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute of General Practice and Primary Care (BIHAM)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM) > Clinic of General Internal Medicine > Centre of Competence for General Internal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM)

UniBE Contributor:

Schwab, Nathalie Christa; Aeberli, Daniel and Rodondi, Nicolas

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

2072-6643

Publisher:

Molecular Diversity Preservation International MDPI

Funders:

[4] Swiss National Science Foundation

Language:

English

Submitter:

Andrea Flükiger-Flückiger

Date Deposited:

08 Apr 2021 09:32

Last Modified:

29 Jul 2021 05:26

Publisher DOI:

10.3390/nu13031042

PubMed ID:

33807102

Uncontrolled Keywords:

NOVA classification dietary advice eating pattern metabolic syndrome processed food time-restricted eating weight loss

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/155662

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/155662

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