Single early palliative care intervention added to usual oncology care for patients with advanced cancer: A randomized controlled trial (SENS Trial).

Eychmüller, Steffen; Zwahlen, Susanne; Fliedner, Monika; Jüni, Peter; Aebersold, Daniel; Aujesky, Drahomir; Fey, Martin; Maessen, Maud; Trelle, Sven (2021). Single early palliative care intervention added to usual oncology care for patients with advanced cancer: A randomized controlled trial (SENS Trial). Palliative medicine, 35(6), pp. 1108-1117. Sage 10.1177/02692163211005340

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BACKGROUND

International oncology societies recommend early palliative care. Specific models to integrate early palliative care efficiently into clinical practice are debated. The authors designed a study to look at the quantitative and qualitative outcomes of an early palliative care intervention in oncological care to decrease stress and improve quality of life.

AIMS

To compare a single structured early palliative care intervention added to a usual oncology care in terms of distress and health-related quality of life at baseline compared to 6 months after enrollment.

DESIGN

This multicenter randomized controlled trial (NCT01983956) enrolled adult patients with advanced cancer. Participants were either randomly assigned to usual oncology care alone or usual care plus a structured early palliative care intervention.

SETTING/PARTICIPANTS

One hundred fifty adult patients with a variety of advanced cancer diagnoses were randomized. Seventy-four participants were in the intervention and 76 participants in the control group. The primary outcome was the change in patient distress assessed by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network distress thermometer at 6 months. Health-related quality of life, the secondary outcome, was assessed by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General Questionnaire.

RESULTS

The results showed no significant effect of the early palliative care intervention neither on patient distress nor on health-related quality of life.

CONCLUSION

The addition of an early intervention to usual care for patients with advanced cancer did not improve distress or quality of life. Thus, patients may need more intensive early palliative care with continuous professional support to identify and address their palliative needs early.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Clinic of Radiation Oncology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > CTU Bern
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM) > Clinic of General Internal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Clinic of Medical Oncology

UniBE Contributor:

Eychmüller, Steffen; Zwahlen, Susanne; Fliedner, Monika; Aebersold, Daniel; Aujesky, Drahomir; Fey, Martin; Maessen, Maud and Trelle, Sven

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

1477-030X

Publisher:

Sage

Funders:

[4] Swiss National Science Foundation

Language:

English

Submitter:

Beatrice Scheidegger

Date Deposited:

07 May 2021 11:59

Last Modified:

09 Jun 2021 01:34

Publisher DOI:

10.1177/02692163211005340

PubMed ID:

33908288

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Neoplasms advance care planning integration of palliative care interdisciplinary health team randomized controlled trial

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/156187

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/156187

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