A novel method to identify sub-seasonal clustering episodes of extreme precipitation events and their contributions to large accumulation periods

Kopp, Jérôme; Rivoire, Pauline; Ali, S. Mubashshir; Barton, Yannick; Martius, Olivia (2021). A novel method to identify sub-seasonal clustering episodes of extreme precipitation events and their contributions to large accumulation periods. Hydrology and earth system sciences, 25(9), pp. 5153-5174. European Geosciences Union EGU 10.5194/hess-25-5153-2021

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Temporal (serial) clustering of extreme precipitation events on sub-seasonal time scales is a type of compound event. It can cause large precipitation accumulations and lead to floods. We present a novel, count-based procedure to identify episodes of sub-seasonal clustering of extreme precipitation. We introduce two metrics to characterise the frequency of sub-seasonal clustering episodes and their relevance for large precipitation accumulations. The procedure does not require the investigated variable (here precipitation) to satisfy any specific statistical properties. Applying this procedure to daily precipitation from the ERA5 reanalysis data set, we identify regions where sub-seasonal clustering occurs frequently and contributes substantially to large precipitation accumulations. The regions are the east and northeast of the Asian continent (north of Yellow Sea, in the Chinese provinces of Hebei, Jilin and Liaoning; North and South Korea; Siberia and east of Mongolia), central Canada and south of California, Afghanistan, Pakistan, the southwest of the Iberian Peninsula, and the north of Argentina and south of Bolivia. Our method is robust with respect to the parameters used to define the extreme events (the percentile threshold and the run length) and the length of the sub-seasonal time window (here 2–4 weeks). This procedure could also be used to identify temporal clustering of other variables (e.g. heat waves) and can be applied on different time scales (sub-seasonal to decadal). The code is available at the listed GitHub repository.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
10 Strategic Research Centers > Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research (OCCR)
08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography > Physical Geography > Unit Impact
08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography > Physical Geography

UniBE Contributor:

Kopp, Jérôme Jean; Rivoire, Pauline Marie Clémence; Ali, Syed Mubashshir; Barton, Yannick and Romppainen-Martius, Olivia

Subjects:

500 Science > 550 Earth sciences & geology
900 History > 910 Geography & travel

ISSN:

1027-5606

Publisher:

European Geosciences Union EGU

Language:

English

Submitter:

Yannick Barton

Date Deposited:

21 Jul 2021 13:43

Last Modified:

11 Oct 2021 16:34

Publisher DOI:

10.5194/hess-25-5153-2021

Related URLs:

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/157418

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/157418

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