Symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in next of kin during suspension of ICU visits during the COVID-19 pandemic: a prospective observational study.

Zante, Bjoern; Erne, Katja; Grossenbacher, Julia; Camenisch, Sabine A.; Schefold, Joerg C.; Jeitziner, Marie-Madlen (2021). Symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in next of kin during suspension of ICU visits during the COVID-19 pandemic: a prospective observational study. BMC psychiatry, 21(1), p. 477. BioMed Central 10.1186/s12888-021-03468-9

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BACKGROUND

During the COVID-19 pandemic, suspension of visits by next of kin to patients in intensive care units (ICU), to prevent spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, has been a common practice. This could impede established family-centered care and may affect the mental health of the next of kin. The aim of this study was to explore symptoms of post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) in the next of kin of ICU patients.

METHODS

In this prospective observational single-center study, next of kin of ICU patients were interviewed by telephone, using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), to assess symptoms of acute stress disorder during the ICU stay and PTSD symptoms at 3 months after the ICU stay. The primary outcome was the prevalence of severe PTSD symptoms (IES-R score ≥ 33) at 3 months. The secondary outcomes comprised the IES-R scores during the ICU stay, at 3 months, and the prevalence of severe symptoms of acute stress disorder during ICU stay. An inductive content analysis was performed of the next of kin's comments regarding satisfaction with patient care and the information they were given.

RESULTS

Of the 411 ICU patients admitted during the study period, 62 patients were included together with their next of kin. An IES-R score > 33 was observed in 90.3% (56/62) of next of kin during the ICU stay and in 69.4% (43/62) 3 months later. The median IES-R score was 49 (IQR 40-61) during the ICU stay and 41 (IQR 30-55) at 3 months. The inductive content analysis showed that communication/information (55%), support (40%), distressing emotions (32%), and suspension of ICU visits (24%) were mentioned as relevant aspects by the next of kin.

CONCLUSIONS

During the suspension of ICU visits in the COVID-19 pandemic, high prevalence and severity of both symptoms of acute stress disorder during the ICU stay and PTSD symptoms 3 months later were observed in the next of kin of ICU patients.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > Clinic and Policlinic for Anaesthesiology and Pain Therapy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > Clinic of Intensive Care

UniBE Contributor:

Zante, Björn; Erne, Katja; Camenisch, Sabine; Schefold, Jörg Christian and Jeitziner, Marie-Madlen

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1471-244X

Publisher:

BioMed Central

Language:

English

Submitter:

Jsabelle Arni

Date Deposited:

21 Oct 2021 16:01

Last Modified:

24 Oct 2021 03:27

Publisher DOI:

10.1186/s12888-021-03468-9

PubMed ID:

34587929

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Critical care Mental distress Post intensive care syndrome–family Psychological disease Relatives Stress disorder

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/159769

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/159769

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