Comparing metacognitive monitoring between native and non‐native speaking primary school students

Buehler, Florian J.; van Loon, Mariëtte H.; Bayard, Natalie S.; Steiner, Martina; Roebers, Claudia M. (2021). Comparing metacognitive monitoring between native and non‐native speaking primary school students. Metacognition and learning, 16(3), pp. 749-768. Springer 10.1007/s11409-021-09261-z

[img]
Preview
Text
Buehler_et_al.__2021_.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (1MB) | Preview

Metacognitive monitoring is a significant predictor of academic achievement and is assumed to be related to language competencies. Hence, it may explain academic performance differences between native and non-native speaking students. We compared metacognitive monitoring (in terms of resolution) between native and non-native speaking fourth graders (~ 10 year olds) in two studies. In Study 1, we matched 30 native and 30 non-native speakers and assessed their monitoring in the context of a paired-associates task, including a recognition test and confidence judgements. Study 1 revealed that recognition and monitoring did not differ between native and non-native speaking children. In Study 2, we matched 36 native and 36 non-native speakers and assessed their monitoring with the same paired-associates task. Additionally, we included a text comprehension task with open-ended questions and confidence judgments. We replicated the findings of Study 1, suggesting that recognition and monitoring do not necessarily differ between native and non-native speakers. However, native speaking students answered more open-ended questions correctly than non-native speaking students did. Nevertheless, the two groups did not differ in monitoring their answers to open-ended questions. Our results indicate that native and non-native speaking children may monitor their metacognitive resolution equally, independent of task performance and characteristics. In conclusion, metacognitive monitoring deficits may not be the primary source of the academic performance differences between native and non-native speaking students.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Developmental Psychology
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Personality Psychology, Differential Psychology and Diagnostics

UniBE Contributor:

Bühler, Florian Jonas; van Loon, Mariëtte Henrica; Bayard, Natalie; Steiner, Martina and Roebers, Claudia

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 370 Education

ISSN:

1556-1623

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Patrick Gerber

Date Deposited:

17 Nov 2021 15:30

Last Modified:

28 Nov 2021 01:50

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s11409-021-09261-z

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/160627

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/160627

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback