Right Inferior Frontal Activation During Alcohol-Specific Inhibition Increases With Craving and Predicts Drinking Outcome in Alcohol Use Disorder

Grieder, Matthias; Soravia, Leila M; Tschümperlin, Raphaela M; Batschelet, Hallie M; Federspiel, Andrea; Schwab, Simon; Morishima, Yosuke; Moggi, Franz; Stein, Maria (2022). Right Inferior Frontal Activation During Alcohol-Specific Inhibition Increases With Craving and Predicts Drinking Outcome in Alcohol Use Disorder. Frontiers in psychiatry, 13 Frontiers 10.3389/fpsyt.2022.909992

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Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is characterized by enhanced cue-reactivity and the opposing control processes being insufficient. The ability to inhibit reactions to alcohol-related cues, alcohol-specific inhibition, is thus crucial to AUD; and trainings strengthening this ability might increase treatment outcome. The present study investigated whether neurophysiological correlates of alcohol-specific inhibition (I) vary with craving, (II) predict drinking outcome in AUD and (III) are modulated by alcohol-specific inhibition training. A total of 45 recently abstinent patients with AUD and 25 controls participated in this study. All participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a Go-NoGo task with alcohol-related as well as neutral conditions. Patients with AUD additionally participated in a double-blind RCT, where they were randomized to either an alcohol-specific inhibition training or an active control condition (non-specific inhibition training). After the training, patients participated in a second fMRI measurement where the Go-NoGo task was repeated. Percentage of days abstinent was assessed as drinking outcome 3 months after discharge from residential treatment. Whole brain analyses indicated that in the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG), activation related to alcohol-specific inhibition varied with craving and predicted drinking outcome at 3-months follow-up. This neurophysiological correlate of alcohol-specific inhibition was however not modulated by the training version. Our results suggest that enhanced rIFG activation during alcohol-specific (compared to neutral) inhibition (I) is needed to inhibit responses when craving is high and (II) fosters sustained abstinence in patients with AUD. As alcoholspecific rIFG activation was not affected by the training, future research might investigate whether potential training effects on neurophysiology are better detectable with other methodological approaches.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Translational Research Center
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy

UniBE Contributor:

Grieder, Matthias; Soravia, Leila; Tschümperlin, Raphaela Martina; Batschelet, Hallie Margareta; Federspiel, Andrea; Schwab, Simon Gabriel; Morishima, Yosuke; Moggi, Franz and Stein, Maria

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1664-0640

Publisher:

Frontiers

Funders:

[UNSPECIFIED] Swiss Foundation for Alcohol Research ; [4] Swiss National Science Foundation

Projects:

Projects 283 not found.
Projects 105319 not found.

Language:

English

Submitter:

Matthias Grieder

Date Deposited:

04 Jul 2022 11:34

Last Modified:

04 Jul 2022 11:34

Publisher DOI:

10.3389/fpsyt.2022.909992

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/171066

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/171066

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