Serotype-specific invasiveness and colonization prevalence in Streptococcus pneumoniae correlate with the lag phase during in vitro growth

Bättig, Patrick; Hathaway, Lucy J; Hofer, Sandra; Mühlemann, Kathrin (2006). Serotype-specific invasiveness and colonization prevalence in Streptococcus pneumoniae correlate with the lag phase during in vitro growth. Microbes and infection, 8(11), pp. 2612-7. Paris: Elsevier Masson SAS 10.1016/j.micinf.2006.07.013

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Serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae differ in colonization prevalence and the likelihood of causing disease. In vitro growth in brain heart infusion broth with or without 5% fetal calf serum (FCS) was compared for 47 clinical isolates representing 15 pneumococcal serotypes. Serotype-specific colonization prevalence and odds ratios for the invasive potential were obtained from an international and a local epidemiological study. The duration of the lag phase increased with the invasiveness and was inversely associated with the colonization prevalence of a serotype. Supplementation with FCS shortened the lag phase preferentially in serotypes associated with invasive disease (P=0.007). Reduction of oxidative stress by addition of manganese (Mn(2+)), Tiron, mannitol or catalase did not influence the duration of the lag phase significantly. Serotype specific invasiveness and colonization prevalence of S. pneumoniae are associated with the length of the lag phase during in vitro growth. This may correlate with serotype specific selection in vivo.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases

UniBE Contributor:

Bättig, Patrick

ISSN:

1286-4579

ISBN:

16938479

Publisher:

Elsevier Masson SAS

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:45

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:13

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.micinf.2006.07.013

PubMed ID:

16938479

Web of Science ID:

000242207100006

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/18815 (FactScience: 1053)

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