Strategies to prevent neuronal damage in paediatric bacterial meningitis

Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L. (2006). Strategies to prevent neuronal damage in paediatric bacterial meningitis. Current opinion in pediatrics, 18(2), pp. 112-118. Philadelphia, Pa.: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 10.1097/01.mop.0000193292.09894.b7

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PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The mortality of bacterial meningitis can reach 30%, and up to 50% of survivors suffer from persisting neurological deficits as a consequence of the disease. The incidence of neurological sequelae of bacterial meningitis has not improved over the last decade. Adjunctive therapeutic options are limited, and ongoing research into the pathophysiology of brain damage in bacterial meningitis aims at providing the scientific basis for future development of more efficient adjunctive options. RECENT FINDINGS: In a population with good access to health care, dexamethasone given before or at the time of initiation of antibiotic therapy acts beneficially in paediatric pneumococcal meningitis, but not in meningococcal meningitis. In experimental animal models, brain-derived neurotrophic factor protected against brain injury and improved hearing while melatonin, which has antioxidant properties among other effects, reduced neuronal death. Transgene technology can be used to provide new insights into the pathophysiology of the disease and to identify potential therapeutic targets. SUMMARY: Although dexamethasone improves outcome of bacterial meningitis under defined circumstances, the morbidity of bacterial meningitis still remains unacceptably high. Experimental models may help to identify new therapeutic strategies to further improve the neurological outcome in young children suffering from bacterial meningitis.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Review Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases

UniBE Contributor:

Leib, Stephen

ISSN:

1040-8703

ISBN:

16601488

Publisher:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:46

Last Modified:

24 Oct 2019 10:33

Publisher DOI:

10.1097/01.mop.0000193292.09894.b7

PubMed ID:

16601488

Web of Science ID:

000202973100004

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.19179

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/19179 (FactScience: 1600)

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