Different trajectories of post-concussive subscales after pediatric mild traumatic brain injury: Data from a prospective longitudinal study

Studer, Martina; Mischler, Lara; Romano, Fabrizio; Lidzba, Karen; Bigi, Sandra (2024). Different trajectories of post-concussive subscales after pediatric mild traumatic brain injury: Data from a prospective longitudinal study. European journal of paediatric neurology, 51, pp. 9-16. Elsevier 10.1016/j.ejpn.2024.05.003

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Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the trajectory of parent-rated post-concussive symptoms (PCS), attentional performance and participation within 6 months in children after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

Methods: For this prospective longitudinal study, we included data on 64 children after mTBI and 57 healthy control children (age 8–16 years). Parents rated PCS using the Post-Concussion Symptom Inventory (PCSI) immediately (T0), 1 week (T1), and 3–6 months after injury (T2). Attentional performance (alertness, selective and divided attention) was measured using the Test of Attentional Performance (TAP) at T1 and T2 and participation was measured using the Child and Adolescent Scale of Participation (CASP) at T2.

Results: Friedman tests showed different trajectories of PCS subscales over time: Compared to pre-injury level, the amount of somatic and cognitive PCS was still elevated at T1, while emotional PCS at T1 were already comparable to pre-injury level. The rating of sleep-related PCS at T2 was significantly elevated compared to the preinjury rating. Quade ANCOVAs indicated group differences in PCS subscales between patients and controls at T1, but not at T2. Patients and controls showed a similar performance in tests of attention at T1 and T2, but parental rating of participation at school was significantly reduced. Although cognitive PCS and attention were not correlated, there were significantly negative Spearman correlations between participation at home and preinjury and concurrent PCS at T2.

Conclusions: Our data imply that sleep-related PCS are still elevated weeks after injury and are thus a target for interventions after mTBI.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine > Neuropaediatrics
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine > Notfallzentrum für Kinder und Jugendliche
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology

UniBE Contributor:

Studer, Martina (A), Romano, Fabrizio, Lidzba, Karen, Bigi, Sandra

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1090-3798

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Chantal Kottler

Date Deposited:

13 May 2024 15:28

Last Modified:

12 Jun 2024 13:59

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.ejpn.2024.05.003

PubMed ID:

38744052

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/196731

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/196731

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