Evidence of native starch degradation with human small intestinal maltase-glucoamylase (recombinant)

Ao, Zihua; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Sim, Lyann; Nichols, Buford L; Rose, David R; Sterchi, Erwin E; Hamaker, Bruce R (2007). Evidence of native starch degradation with human small intestinal maltase-glucoamylase (recombinant). FEBS letters, 581(13), pp. 2381-8. Amsterdam: Elsevier 10.1016/j.febslet.2007.04.035

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Action of human small intestinal brush border carbohydrate digesting enzymes is thought to involve only final hydrolysis reactions of oligosaccharides to monosaccharides. In vitro starch digestibility assays use fungal amyloglucosidase to provide this function. In this study, recombinant N-terminal subunit enzyme of human small intestinal maltase-glucoamylase (rhMGAM-N) was used to explore digestion of native starches from different botanical sources. The susceptibilities to enzyme hydrolysis varied among the starches. The rate and extent of hydrolysis of amylomaize-5 and amylomaize-7 into glucose were greater than for other starches. Such was not observed with fungal amyloglucosidase or pancreatic alpha-amylase. The degradation of native starch granules showed a surface furrowed pattern in random, radial, or tree-like arrangements that differed substantially from the erosion patterns of amyloglucosidase or alpha-amylase. The evidence of raw starch granule degradation with rhMGAM-N indicates that pancreatic alpha-amylase hydrolysis is not a requirement for native starch digestion in the human small intestine.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Sterchi, Erwin-Ernst

ISSN:

0014-5793

ISBN:

17485087

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:53

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:15

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.febslet.2007.04.035

PubMed ID:

17485087

Web of Science ID:

000247087600001

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/22696 (FactScience: 36061)

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