Influence of granulocytes on brain edema, intracranial pressure, and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of lactate and protein in experimental meningitis

Täuber, MG; Borschberg, U; Sande, MA (1988). Influence of granulocytes on brain edema, intracranial pressure, and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of lactate and protein in experimental meningitis. Journal of infectious diseases, 157(3), pp. 456-64. Cary, N.C.: Oxford University Press 10.1093/infdis/157.3.456

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Brain water content (brain edema), intracranial pressure, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of lactate and protein increased significantly during 24 h of experimental meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae, but changes were similar in normal and neutropenic rabbits. In sterile meningitis induced by N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenyl-alanine (fMLP), low and high doses of fMLP were equally effective in inducing CSF pleocytosis, whereas only high doses of fMLP caused brain edema. High doses of fMLP injected intracisternally during pneumococcal meningitis also increased brain water content. The fMLP did not significantly increase intracranial pressure or CSF concentrations of lactate or protein in sterile or pneumococcal meningitis, nor did it cause brain edema in neutropenic animals. Thus, granulocytes may contribute to brain edema during meningitis if adequately stimulated, but intracranial pressure and CSF protein and lactate concentrations appear independent of granulocytes. Stimulation does not appear to occur early in meningitis, when granulocytes were without effect on brain edema.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases

UniBE Contributor:

Täuber, Martin G.

ISSN:

0022-1899

ISBN:

3343521

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:00

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:17

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/infdis/157.3.456

PubMed ID:

3343521

Web of Science ID:

A1988M176300010

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/25812 (FactScience: 60999)

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