Can outcome prediction data change patient outcomes and organizational outcomes?

Rothen, Hans Ulrich; Takala, Jukka (2008). Can outcome prediction data change patient outcomes and organizational outcomes? Current opinion in critical care, 14(5), pp. 513-9. Hagerstown, Md.: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 10.1097/MCC.0b013e32830864e9

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PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Intensive care medicine consumes a high share of healthcare costs, and there is growing pressure to use the scarce resources efficiently. Accordingly, organizational issues and quality management have become an important focus of interest in recent years. Here, we will review current concepts of how outcome data can be used to identify areas requiring action. RECENT FINDINGS: Using recently established models of outcome assessment, wide variability between individual ICUs is found, both with respect to outcome and resource use. Such variability implies that there are large differences in patient care processes not only within the ICU but also in pre-ICU and post-ICU care. Indeed, measures to improve the patient process in the ICU (including care of the critically ill, patient safety, and management of the ICU) have been presented in a number of recently published papers. SUMMARY: Outcome assessment models provide an important framework for benchmarking. They may help the individual ICU to spot appropriate fields of action, plan and initiate quality improvement projects, and monitor the consequences of such activity.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > Clinic of Intensive Care

UniBE Contributor:

Rothen, Hans Ulrich and Takala, Jukka

ISSN:

1070-5295

ISBN:

18787442

Publisher:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:04

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:19

Publisher DOI:

10.1097/MCC.0b013e32830864e9

PubMed ID:

18787442

Web of Science ID:

000260244000006

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/27838 (FactScience: 112393)

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