Family satisfaction in the intensive care unit: what makes the difference?

Stricker, Kay H; Kimberger, Oliver; Schmidlin, Kurt; Zwahlen, Marcel; Mohr, Ulrike; Rothen, Hans U (2009). Family satisfaction in the intensive care unit: what makes the difference? Intensive care medicine, 35(12), pp. 2051-9. Berlin: Springer-Verlag 10.1007/s00134-009-1611-4

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PURPOSE: To assess family satisfaction in the ICU and to identify parameters for improvement. METHODS: Multicenter study in Swiss ICUs. Families were given a questionnaire covering overall satisfaction, satisfaction with care and satisfaction with information/decision-making. Demographic, medical and institutional data were gathered from patients, visitors and ICUs. RESULTS: A total of 996 questionnaires from family members were analyzed. Individual questions were assessed, and summary measures (range 0-100) were calculated, with higher scores indicating greater satisfaction. Summary score was 78 +/- 14 (mean +/- SD) for overall satisfaction, 79 +/- 14 for care and 77 +/- 15 for information/decision-making. In multivariable multilevel linear regression analyses, higher severity of illness was associated with higher satisfaction, while a higher patient:nurse ratio and written admission/discharge criteria were associated with lower overall satisfaction. Using performance-importance plots, items with high impact on overall satisfaction but low satisfaction were identified. They included: emotional support, providing understandable, complete, consistent information and coordination of care. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, proxies were satisfied with care and with information/decision-making. Still, several factors, such as emotional support, coordination of care and communication, are associated with poor satisfaction, suggesting the need for improvement. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00134-009-1611-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > Clinic of Intensive Care
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > Clinic and Policlinic for Anaesthesiology and Pain Therapy

UniBE Contributor:

Stricker, Kay; Schmidlin, Kurt; Zwahlen, Marcel; Mohr, Ulrike Cornelia and Rothen, Hans Ulrich

ISSN:

0342-4642

Publisher:

Springer-Verlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Jeannie Wurz

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:11

Last Modified:

26 Jun 2018 14:44

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00134-009-1611-4

PubMed ID:

19730813

Web of Science ID:

000271981200009

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.31286

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/31286 (FactScience: 195733)

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