The devaluation effect: activating a need devalues unrelated objects

Brendl, C. Miguel; Markman, Arthur B.; Messner, Claude (2003). The devaluation effect: activating a need devalues unrelated objects. Journal of Consumer Research, 29(4), pp. 463-473. American Marketing Association

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It is commonly assumed that an object capable of satisfying a need will be perceived as subjectively more valuable as the need for it intensifies. For example, the more active the need to eat, the more valuable food will become. This outcome could be called a valuation effect. In this article, we suggest a second basic influence of needs on evaluations: that activating a focal need (e.g., to eat) makes objects unrelated to that need (e.g., shampoo) less valuable, an outcome we refer to as the devaluation effect. Two existing studies support the existence of a devaluation effect using manipulations of the need to eat and to smoke and measuring attractiveness of consumer products and willingness to purchase raffle tickets. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that consumers are not aware of the devaluation effect and its influence on their preferences.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

03 Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences > Department of Business Management > Institute of Innovation Management > Consumer Behavior

UniBE Contributor:

Messner, Claude Mathias

Subjects:

600 Technology > 650 Management & public relations
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 330 Economics

ISSN:

0022-2437

Publisher:

American Marketing Association

Language:

English

Submitter:

Claude Mathias Messner

Date Deposited:

17 Jul 2014 12:20

Last Modified:

19 Feb 2019 13:38

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.42531

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/42531

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