Effects of beta-alanine supplementation and interval training on physiological determinants of severe exercise performance.

Gross, Micah Ambrose Donovan; Boesch, Chris; Bolliger, Christine; Norman, Barbara; Gustafsson, Thomas; Hoppeler, Hans-Heinrich; Vogt, Michael (2014). Effects of beta-alanine supplementation and interval training on physiological determinants of severe exercise performance. European journal of applied physiology, 114(2), pp. 221-234. Springer 10.1007/s00421-013-2767-8

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INTRODUCTION We aimed to manipulate physiological determinants of severe exercise performance. We hypothesized that (1) beta-alanine supplementation would increase intramuscular carnosine and buffering capacity and dampen acidosis during severe cycling, (2) that high-intensity interval training (HIT) would enhance aerobic energy contribution during severe cycling, and (3) that HIT preceded by beta-alanine supplementation would have greater benefits. METHODS Sixteen active men performed incremental cycling tests and 90-s severe (110 % peak power) cycling tests at three time points: before and after oral supplementation with either beta-alanine or placebo, and after an 11-days HIT block (9 sessions, 4 × 4 min), which followed supplementation. Carnosine was assessed via MR spectroscopy. Energy contribution during 90-s severe cycling was estimated from the O2 deficit. Biopsies from m. vastus lateralis were taken before and after the test. RESULTS Beta-alanine increased leg muscle carnosine (32 ± 13 %, d = 3.1). Buffering capacity and incremental cycling were unaffected, but during 90-s severe cycling, beta-alanine increased aerobic energy contribution (1.4 ± 1.3 %, d = 0.5), concurrent with reduced O2 deficit (-5.0 ± 5.0 %, d = 0.6) and muscle lactate accumulation (-23 ± 30 %, d = 0.9), while having no effect on pH. Beta-alanine also enhanced motivation and perceived state during the HIT block. There were no between-group differences in adaptations to the training block, namely increased buffering capacity (+7.9 ± 11.9 %, p = 0.04, d = 0.6, n = 14) and glycogen storage (+30 ± 47 %, p = 0.04, d = 0.5, n = 16). CONCLUSIONS Beta-alanine did not affect buffering considerably, but has beneficial effects on severe exercise metabolism as well as psychological parameters during intense training phases.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine (DRNN) > Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology > DCR Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Methodology (AMSM)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > Forschungsbereich Pavillon 52 > Abt. Magnetresonanz-Spektroskopie und Methodologie, AMSM
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Anatomy > Functional Anatomy

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences (GCB)

UniBE Contributor:

Gross, Micah Ambrose Donovan; Bösch, Christoph Hans; Bolliger, Christine; Hoppeler, Hans-Heinrich and Vogt, Michael

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1439-6319

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Christoph Hans Boesch

Date Deposited:

24 Jul 2014 16:36

Last Modified:

19 Apr 2016 12:34

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00421-013-2767-8

PubMed ID:

24213883

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.43870

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/43870

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