Multiple osteosclerotic lesions in an Iron Age skull from Switzerland (320 - 250 BC) - An unusual case

Moghaddam, Negahnaz; Langer, Rupert; Ross, Steffen; Nielsen, Ebbe; Lösch, Sandra (2013). Multiple osteosclerotic lesions in an Iron Age skull from Switzerland (320 - 250 BC) - An unusual case. Swiss medical weekly, 29(143), w13819. EMH Schweizerischer Ärzteverlag 10.4414/smw.2013.13819

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The single Hochdorf burial was found in 1887 during construction work in the Canton of Lucerne, Switzerland. It dates from between 320 and 250 BC. The calvarium, the left half of the pelvis and the left femur were preserved. The finding shows an unusual bony alteration of the skull. The aim of this study was to obtain a differential diagnosis and to examine the skull using various methods. Sex and age were determined anthropologically. Radiological examinations were performed with plain X-ray imaging and a multislice computed tomography (CT) scanner. For histological analysis, samples of the lesion were taken. The pathological processing included staining after fixation, decalcification, and paraffin embedding. Hard-cut sections were also prepared. The individual was female. The age at death was between 30 and 50 years. There is an intensely calcified bone proliferation at the right side of the os frontalis. Plain X-ray and CT imaging showed a large sclerotic lesion in the area of the right temple with a partly bulging appearance. The inner boundary of the lesion shows multi-edged irregularities. There is a diffuse thickening of the right side. In the left skull vault, there is a mix of sclerotic areas and areas which appear to be normal with a clear differentiation between tabula interna, diploë and tabula externa. Histology showed mature organised bone tissue. Radiological and histological findings favour a benign condition. Differential diagnoses comprise osteomas which may occur, for example, in the setting of hereditary adenomatous polyposis coli related to Gardner syndrome.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Legal Medicine > Anthropology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Pathology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Legal Medicine
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Palaeoecology
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)

UniBE Contributor:

Hossein Moghaddam Horri, Negahnaz; Langer, Rupert; Ross, Steffen; Nielsen, Ebbe Holm and Lösch, Sandra

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

ISSN:

1424-7860

Publisher:

EMH Schweizerischer Ärzteverlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Katrin Renfer

Date Deposited:

07 Apr 2014 10:25

Last Modified:

18 Dec 2014 10:48

Publisher DOI:

10.4414/smw.2013.13819

PubMed ID:

23897004

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.44637

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/44637

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