Varicella zoster virus reactivation after autologous SCT is a frequent event and associated with favorable outcome in myeloma patients.

Kamber, C; Zimmerli, Stefan; Suter, Franziska Marta; Müller, Beatrice Ursula; Mansouri Taleghani, Behrouz; Betticher, Daniel; Zander, T; Pabst, Thomas (2015). Varicella zoster virus reactivation after autologous SCT is a frequent event and associated with favorable outcome in myeloma patients. Bone marrow transplantation, 50(4), pp. 573-578. Nature Publishing Group 10.1038/bmt.2014.290

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The occurrence of varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation is increased after allogeneic transplantation, whereas limited data are available for herpes zoster (HZ) after autologous SCT (ASCT). We determined the incidence and the prognostic significance of HZ and its correlation with VZV serology in 191 consecutive myeloma patients undergoing high-dose melphalan chemotherapy with ASCT. We found that VZV reactivation occurred in 57 (30%) patients, in 8.5% during induction and in 21.5% after ASCT peaking at 8 months after ASCT. Disease burden due to HZ was assessed as high or rather high in 70% of the patients. By immune fluorescence and Serion Elisa VZV IgG assessment, 90.8% of all patients had specific anti-VZV antibodies at ASCT. Lower specific antibody titers at transplantation were observed in patients with HZ after ASCT than in those without reactivation (P=0.009). Finally, OS was better in myeloma patients with HZ after ASCT compared with patients without HZ (P=0.007). Our data indicate that VZV reactivation after ASCT is a frequent event carrying a significant disease burden and it is associated with improved survival. Low levels of specific VZV antibodies at ASCT suggest increased vulnerability for VZV reactivation.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 19 January 2015; doi:10.1038/bmt.2014.290.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Clinic of Infectiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Clinic of Haematology and Central Haematological Laboratory
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Clinic of Medical Oncology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Hämatologie / Onkologie (Pädiatrie)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Hämatologie / Onkologie (Pädiatrie)

UniBE Contributor:

Zimmerli, Stefan; Suter, Franziska Marta; Müller, Beatrice Ursula; Mansouri Taleghani, Behrouz; Betticher, Daniel and Pabst, Thomas

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0268-3369

Publisher:

Nature Publishing Group

Language:

English

Submitter:

Annelies Luginbühl

Date Deposited:

10 Feb 2015 10:18

Last Modified:

19 Oct 2015 11:09

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/bmt.2014.290

PubMed ID:

25599166

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.62540

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/62540

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