Electrolyte disorders and in-hospital mortality during prolonged heat periods: a cross-sectional analysis

Pfortmüller, Carmen A.; Funk, Georg-Christian; Leichtle, Alexander Benedikt; Fiedler, Martin; Schwarz, Christoph; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis; Lindner, Gregor (2014). Electrolyte disorders and in-hospital mortality during prolonged heat periods: a cross-sectional analysis. PLoS ONE, 9(3), e92150. Public Library of Science 10.1371/journal.pone.0092150

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BACKGROUND Heat periods during recent years were associated with excess hospitalization and mortality rates, especially in the elderly. We intended to study whether prolonged warmth/heat periods are associated with an increased prevalence of disorders of serum sodium and potassium and an increased hospital mortality. METHODS In this cross-sectional analysis all patients admitted to the Department of Emergency Medicine of a large tertiary care facility between January 2009 and December 2010 with measurements of serum sodium were included. Demographic data along with detailed data on diuretic medication, length of hospital stay and hospital mortality were obtained for all patients. Data on daily temperatures (maximum, mean, minimum) and humidity were retrieved by Meteo Swiss. RESULTS A total of 22.239 patients were included in the study. 5 periods with a temperature exceeding 25 °C for 3 to 5 days were noticed and 2 periods with temperatures exceeding 25 °C for more than 5 days were noted. Additionally, 2 periods with 3 to 5 days with daily temperatures exceeding 30 °C were noted during the study period. We found a significantly increased prevalence of hyponatremia during heat periods. However, in the Cox regression analysis, prolonged heat was not associated with the prevalence of disorders of serum sodium or potassium. Admission during a heat period was an independent predictor for hospital mortality. CONCLUSIONS Although we found an increased prevalence of hyponatremia during heat periods, no convincing connection could be found for hypernatremia or disorders of serum potassium.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM) > Clinic of General Internal Medicine > Centre of Competence for General Internal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > University Emergency Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Institute of Clinical Chemistry

UniBE Contributor:

Pfortmüller, Carmen; Leichtle, Alexander Benedikt; Fiedler, Martin; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis and Lindner, Gregor

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1932-6203

Publisher:

Public Library of Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Barbara Keller

Date Deposited:

06 Mar 2015 16:07

Last Modified:

05 Jun 2015 14:25

Publisher DOI:

10.1371/journal.pone.0092150

PubMed ID:

24651296

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.64173

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/64173

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