Elucidating the internal structure of psychophysical timing performance in the sub-second and second range by utilizing confirmatory factor analysis

Rammsayer, Thomas; Troche, Stefan (2014). Elucidating the internal structure of psychophysical timing performance in the sub-second and second range by utilizing confirmatory factor analysis. In: Merchant, Hugo; de Lafuente, Victor (eds.) Neurobiology of interval timing. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology: Vol. 829 (pp. 33-47). New York: Springer 10.1007/978-1-4939-1782-2_3

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The most influential theoretical account in time psychophysics assumes the existence of a unitary internal clock based on neural counting. The distinct timing hypothesis, on the other hand, suggests an automatic timing mechanism for processing of durations in the sub-second range and a cognitively controlled timing mechanism for processing of durations in the range of seconds. Although several psychophysical approaches can be applied for identifying the internal structure of interval timing in the second and sub-second range, the existing data provide a puzzling picture of rather inconsistent results. In the present chapter, we introduce confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to further elucidate the internal structure of interval timing performance in the sub-second and second range. More specifically, we investigated whether CFA would rather support the notion of a unitary timing mechanism or of distinct timing mechanisms underlying interval timing in the sub-second and second range, respectively. The assumption of two distinct timing mechanisms which are completely independent of each other was not supported by our data. The model assuming a unitary timing mechanism underlying interval timing in both the sub-second and second range fitted the empirical data much better. Eventually, we also tested a third model assuming two distinct, but functionally related mechanisms. The correlation between the two latent variables representing the hypothesized timing mechanisms was rather high and comparison of fit indices indicated that the assumption of two associated timing mechanisms described the observed data better than only one latent variable. Models are discussed in the light of the existing psychophysical and neurophysiological data.

Item Type:

Book Section (Book Chapter)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Personality Psychology, Differential Psychology and Diagnostics

UniBE Contributor:

Rammsayer, Thomas and Troche, Stefan

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 370 Education

ISSN:

0065-2598

ISBN:

978-1-4939-1782-2

Series:

Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Karin Dubler

Date Deposited:

25 Mar 2015 11:29

Last Modified:

22 Oct 2015 09:33

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/978-1-4939-1782-2_3

PubMed ID:

25358704

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.65433

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/65433

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