Age-related variety in electrolyte levels and prevalence of dysnatremias and dyskalemias in patients presenting to the emergency department.

Lindner, Gregor; Pfortmüller, Carmen; Leichtle, Alexander Benedikt; Fiedler, Martin; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis (2014). Age-related variety in electrolyte levels and prevalence of dysnatremias and dyskalemias in patients presenting to the emergency department. Gerontology, 60(5), pp. 420-423. Karger 10.1159/000360134

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

BACKGROUND It was found that age and female gender are predisposing factors for hyponatremia in patients taking thiazides. OBJECTIVE To investigate whether a relationship exists between age and gender and serum sodium and potassium as well as the prevalence rates in a large population of patients presenting to the emergency department of a university hospital. METHODS In this retrospective analysis we gathered data on age, gender and current diuretic medication of all patients admitted to the emergency department of a large university hospital with measurement of serum sodium and potassium between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2010. Prevalence rates of and risk factors for electrolyte disorders were calculated on the basis of these data. RESULTS A total of 20,667 patients were included in the analysis. Serum sodium levels declined significantly with increasing age while serum potassium rose, independent of diuretic medication at presentation. The prevalence rates of hyponatremia and hyperkalemia increased from 2.3% for hyponatremia in patients aged 16-21 years to 16.9% in patients aged >80 years and from 0.8% for hyperkalemia to 10.4%. In the regression analysis, age >60 years was a predictor for the presence of hyponatremia and hyperkalemia as was current use of diuretic medication. Male gender was associated with a decreased prevalence of hyponatremia and hypokalemia, while it was a predictor of hyperkalemia. CONCLUSIONS Sodium levels were lower with increasing age, independent of diuretic intake, while potassium levels were higher. We found dramatically increasing prevalences of hyponatremia and hyperkalemia with increasing age, while no such effect could be found for hypernatremia and hypokalemia.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM) > Clinic of General Internal Medicine > Centre of Competence for General Internal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > University Emergency Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Institute of Clinical Chemistry

UniBE Contributor:

Lindner, Gregor; Pfortmüller, Carmen; Leichtle, Alexander Benedikt; Fiedler, Martin and Exadaktylos, Aristomenis

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0304-324X

Publisher:

Karger

Language:

English

Submitter:

Barbara Keller

Date Deposited:

01 Apr 2015 16:09

Last Modified:

09 Nov 2015 11:41

Publisher DOI:

10.1159/000360134

PubMed ID:

24854398

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/65704

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback