Efficacy of motivational enhancement therapy on alcohol use disorders in patients with chronic hepatitis C: a randomized controlled trial

Dieperink, Eric; Fuller, Bret; Isenhart, Carl; McMaken, Kelly; Lenox, Rebecca; Pocha, Christine; Thuras, Paul; Hauser, Peter (2014). Efficacy of motivational enhancement therapy on alcohol use disorders in patients with chronic hepatitis C: a randomized controlled trial. Addiction, 109(11), pp. 1869-1877. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/add.12679

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AIMS: To determine the efficacy of motivational enhancement therapy (MET) on alcohol use in patients with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and an alcohol use disorder (AUD). DESIGN: Randomized, single-blind, controlled trial comparing MET to a control education condition with 6-month follow-up. SETTING: Patients were recruited from hepatitis clinics at the Minneapolis, Minnesota and Portland, Oregon Veterans Affairs Health Care Systems, USA. PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTION: Patients with HCV, an AUD and continued alcohol use (n = 139) were randomized to receive either MET (n = 70) or a control education condition (n = 69) over 3 months. MEASUREMENTS: Data were self-reported percentage of days abstinent from alcohol and number of standard alcohol drinks per week 6 months after randomization. FINDINGS: At baseline, subjects in MET had 34.98% days abstinent, which increased to 73.15% at 6 months compared to 34.63 and 59.49% for the control condition. Multi-level models examined changes in alcohol consumption between MET and control groups. Results showed a significant increase in percentage of days abstinent overall (F(1120.4)  = 28.04, P < 0.001) and a significant group × time effect (F(1119.9)  = 5.23, P = 0.024) with the MET group showing a greater increase in percentage of days abstinent at 6 months compared with the education control condition. There were no significant differences between groups for drinks per week. The effect size of the MET intervention was moderate (0.45) for percentage of days abstinent. CONCLUSION: Motivational enhancement therapy (MET) appears to increase the percentage of days abstinent in patients with chronic hepatitis C, alcohol use disorders and ongoing alcohol use. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Hepatologie
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Hepatologie

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Hepatology

UniBE Contributor:

Pocha, Christine

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0965-2140

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Lilian Karin Smith-Wirth

Date Deposited:

16 Apr 2015 14:02

Last Modified:

06 Nov 2015 09:39

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/add.12679

PubMed ID:

25040898

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Alcohol; alcohol use disorder; hepatitis C; liver disease; motivation; motivational enhancement therapy

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.66936

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/66936

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