Cannabinoid receptor type I modulates alcohol-induced liver fibrosis

Patsenker, Eleonora; Stoll, Matthias; Millonig, Gunda; Agaimy, Abbas; Wissniowski, Till; Schneider, Vreni; Mueller, Sebastian; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Seitz, Helmut K; Ocker, Matthias; Stickel, Felix (2011). Cannabinoid receptor type I modulates alcohol-induced liver fibrosis. Molecular medicine, 17(11-12), pp. 1285-94. Manhasset, NY: Feinstein Institute for Medical Research 10.2119/molmed.2011.00149

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

The cannabinoid system (CS) is implicated in the regulation of hepatic fibrosis, steatosis and inflammation, with cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) being involved in regulation of pro- and antifibrogenic effects. Daily cannabis smoking is an independent risk factor for the progression of fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C and a mediator of experimental alcoholic steatosis. However, the role and function of CS in alcoholic liver fibrosis (ALF) is unknown so far. Thus, human liver samples from patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) were collected for analysis of CB1 expression. In vitro, hepatic stellate cells (HSC) underwent treatment with acetaldehyde, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol H(2)O(2), endo- and exocannabinoids (2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and [THC]), and CB1 antagonist SR141716 (rimonabant). In vivo, CB1 knockout (KO) mice received thioacetamide (TAA)/ethanol (EtOH) to induce fibrosis. As a result, in human ALD, CB1 expression was restricted to areas with advanced fibrosis only. In vitro, acetaldehyde, H(2)O(2), as well as 2-AG and THC, alone or in combination with acetaldehyde, induced CB1 mRNA expression, whereas CB1 blockage with SR141716 dose-dependently inhibited HSC proliferation and downregulated mRNA expression of fibrosis-mediated genes PCα1(I), TIMP-1 and MMP-13. This was paralleled by marked cytotoxicity of SR141716 at high doses (5-10 μmol/L). In vivo, CB1 knockout mice showed marked resistance to alcoholic liver fibrosis. In conclusion, CB1 expression is upregulated in human ALF, which is at least in part triggered by acetaldehyde (AA) and oxidative stress. Inhibition of CB1 by SR141716, or via genetic knock-out protects against alcoholic-induced fibrosis in vitro and in vivo.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Phytopharmakologie, Bioanalytik & Pharmakokinetik (discontinued)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Phytopharmakologie, Bioanalytik & Pharmakokinetik (discontinued)

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Hepatology

UniBE Contributor:

Brenneisen, Rudolf Max and Stickel, Felix

ISSN:

1076-1551

Publisher:

Feinstein Institute for Medical Research

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:21

Last Modified:

06 Dec 2013 13:27

Publisher DOI:

10.2119/molmed.2011.00149

PubMed ID:

21863215

Web of Science ID:

000297958800019

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/6998 (FactScience: 212133)

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback