Genetics of recurrent airway obstruction (RAO)

Gerber, Vinzenz; Swinburne, J E; Blott, S C; Nussbaumer, Päivi; Ramseyer, Alessandra; Klukowska-Rötzler, J; Dolf, Gaudenz; Marti, Eliane Isabelle; Burger, Dominik; Leeb, Tosso (2008). Genetics of recurrent airway obstruction (RAO). DTW. Deutsche tierärztliche Wochenschrift, 115(7), pp. 271-275. Verlag M. & H. Schaper 10.2376/0341-6593-115-271

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Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) is a multifactorial and polygenic disease. Affected horses are typically 7 years of age or older and show exercise intolerance, increased breathing effort, coughing, airway neutrophilia, mucus accumulation and hyperreactivity as well as cholinergic bronchospasm. The environmental factors responsible are predominantly allergens and irritants in haydust, but the immunological mechanisms underlying RAO are still unclear. Several studies have demonstrated a familiar predisposition for RAO and it is now proven that the disease has a genetic basis. In offspring, the risk of developing RAO is 3-fold increased when one parent is affected and increases to almost 5-fold when both parents have RAO. Segregation analysis in two high-prevalence families demonstrated a high heritability and a complex inheritance with several major genes. A whole genomescan showed chromosome-wide significant linkage of seven chromosomal regions with RAO. Of the microsatellites, which were located near atopy candidate genes, those in a region of chromosome 13 harboring the IL4R gene were strongly associated with the RAO phenotype in the offspring of one RAO-affected stallion. Furthermore, IgE-levels are influenced by hereditary factors in the horse, and we have evidence that RAO-affected offspring of the same stallion have increased levels of specific IgE against moldspore allergens. The identification of genetic markers and ultimately of the responsible genes will not only allow for an improved prophylaxis, i.e. early identification of susceptible individuals and avoidance of high-risk matings, but also improve our ability to find new therapeutic targets and to optimize existing treatments.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Equine Clinic
05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Host-Pathogen Interaction
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Experimental Clinical Research
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Institute of Genetics
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)

UniBE Contributor:

Gerber, Vinzenz; Nussbaumer, Päivi; Ramseyer, Alessandra; Dolf, Gaudenz; Marti, Eliane Isabelle; Burger, Dominik and Leeb, Tosso

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture
500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
500 Science > 590 Animals (Zoology)
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0341-6593

Publisher:

Verlag M. & H. Schaper

Language:

German

Submitter:

Tosso Leeb

Date Deposited:

14 Aug 2015 14:36

Last Modified:

14 Aug 2015 14:36

Publisher DOI:

10.2376/0341-6593-115-271

PubMed ID:

18672738

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/70774

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