Oxygen-transfer performance of a newly designed, very low-volume membrane oxygenator.

Burn, Felice; Ciocan, Sorin; Mendez Carmona, Natalia; Berner, Marion; Sourdon, Joevin; Carrel, Thierry; Tevaearai, Hendrik; Henning Longnus, Sarah (2015). Oxygen-transfer performance of a newly designed, very low-volume membrane oxygenator. Interactive cardiovascular and thoracic surgery, 21(3), pp. 352-358. Oxford University Press 10.1093/icvts/ivv141

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OBJECTIVES Oxygenation of blood and other physiological solutions are routinely required in fundamental research for both in vitro and in vivo experimentation. However, very few oxygenators with suitable priming volumes (<2-3 ml) are available for surgery in small animals. We have designed a new, miniaturized membrane oxygenator and investigated the oxygen-transfer performance using both buffer and blood perfusates. METHODS The mini-oxygenator was designed with a central perforated core-tube surrounded by parallel-oriented microporous polypropylene hollow fibres, placed inside a hollow shell with a lateral-luer outlet, and sealed at both extremities. With this design, perfusate is delivered via the core-tube to the centre of the mini-oxygenator, and exits via the luer port. A series of mini-oxygenators were constructed and tested in an in vitro perfusion circuit by monitoring oxygen transfer using modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer or whole porcine blood. Effects of perfusion pressure and temperature over flows of 5-60 ml × min(-1) were assessed. RESULTS Twelve mini-oxygenators with a mean priming volume of 1.5 ± 0.3 ml were evaluated. With buffer, oxygen transfer reached a maximum of 14.8 ± 1.0 ml O2 × l(-1) (pO2: 450 ± 32 mmHg) at perfusate flow rates of 5 ml × min(-1) and decreased with an increase in perfusate flow to 7.8 ± 0.7 ml ml O2 × l(-1) (pO2: 219 ± 24 mmHg) at 60 ml × min(-1). Similarly, with blood perfusate, oxygen transfer also decreased as perfusate flow increased, ranging from 33 ± 5 ml O2 × l(-1) at 5 ml × min(-1) to 11 ± 2 ml O2 × l(-1) at 60 ml × min(-1). Furthermore, oxygen transfer capacity remained stable with blood perfusion over a period of at least 2 h. CONCLUSIONS We have developed a new miniaturized membrane oxygenator with an ultra-low priming volume (<2 ml) and adequate oxygenation performance. This oxygenator may be of use in overcoming current limitations in equipment size for effective oxygenation in low-volume perfusion circuits, such as small animal extracorporeal circulation and ex vivo organ perfusion.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Cardiovascular Disorders (DHGE) > Clinic of Cardiovascular Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Herz- und Gefässchirurgie
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Herz- und Gefässchirurgie

UniBE Contributor:

Ciocan, Sorin; Mendez Carmona, Natalia; Sourdon, Joevin; Carrel, Thierry; Tevaearai, Hendrik and Henning Longnus, Sarah

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1569-9293

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Daniela Huber

Date Deposited:

27 Jan 2016 08:55

Last Modified:

21 Apr 2016 16:28

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/icvts/ivv141

PubMed ID:

26037378

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Blood oxygenation; Isolated perfused organ; Mini-oxygenator; Miniaturized membrane oxygenator; Small animal extracorporeal circulation; Small animal model

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.75014

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/75014

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