Virtual Patients in continuing medical education and residency training: a pilot project for acceptance analysis in the framework of a residency revision course in pediatrics.

Lehmann, Ronny; Hanebeck, Benjamin; Oberle, Stephan; Simon, Anke; Choukair, Daniela; Tönshoff, Burkhard; Huwendiek, Sören (2015). Virtual Patients in continuing medical education and residency training: a pilot project for acceptance analysis in the framework of a residency revision course in pediatrics. GMS Zeitschrift für medizinische Ausbildung, 32(5), Doc51. German Medical Science 10.3205/zma000993

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AIM Virtual patients (VPs) are a one-of-a-kind e-learning resource, fostering clinical reasoning skills through clinical case examples. The combination with face-to-face teaching is important for their successful integration, which is referred to as "blended learning". So far little is known about the use of VPs in the field of continuing medical education and residency training. The pilot study presented here inquired the application of VPs in the framework of a pediatric residency revision course. METHODS Around 200 participants of a pediatric nephology lecture ('nephrotic and nephritic syndrome in children') were offered two VPs as a wrap-up session at the revision course of the German Society for Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine (DGKJ) 2009 in Heidelberg, Germany. Using a web-based survey form, different aspects were evaluated concerning the learning experiences with VPs, the combination with the lecture, and the use of VPs for residency training in general. RESULTS N=40 evaluable survey forms were returned (approximately 21%). The return rate was impaired by a technical problem with the local Wi-Fi firewall. The participants perceived the work-up of the VPs as a worthwhile learning experience, with proper preparation for diagnosing and treating real patients with similar complaints. Case presentations, interactivity, and locally and timely independent repetitive practices were, in particular, pointed out. On being asked about the use of VPs in general for residency training, there was a distinct demand for more such offers. CONCLUSION VPs may reasonably complement existing learning activities in residency training.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute for Medical Education
04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute for Medical Education > Assessment and Evaluation Unit (AAE)

UniBE Contributor:

Huwendiek, Sören

ISSN:

1860-3572

Publisher:

German Medical Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Eveline Götschmann-Meile

Date Deposited:

07 Mar 2016 08:36

Last Modified:

16 Jan 2017 14:58

Publisher DOI:

10.3205/zma000993

PubMed ID:

26604993

Uncontrolled Keywords:

blended learning; continuing medical education; medical education; residency training; virtual patients

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.76352

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/76352

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