Impact of case-relevant and case-irrelevant communication within the surgical team on surgical-site infection

Tschan, Franziska; Seelandt, J C; Keller, S; Semmer, Norbert; Candinas, Daniel; Beldi, Guido; Kurmann, Anita (2015). Impact of case-relevant and case-irrelevant communication within the surgical team on surgical-site infection. The British journal of surgery, 102(13), pp. 1718-1725. Wiley Interscience 10.1002/bjs.9927

[img]
Preview
Text
Beldi_Impact of case-relevant and case-irrelevant communication within the surgical team on surgical-site infection_proof.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (471kB) | Preview
[img] Text
bjs9927.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (208kB) | Request a copy

BACKGROUND Surgical-site infections (SSIs) are the most common complications after surgery. An influence from talking and distractions during surgery on patient outcomes has been suggested, but there is limited evidence. The aim of this prospective observational study was to assess the relationship between intraoperative communication within the surgical team and SSI, and between intraoperative distractions and SSI. METHODS This prospective observational study included patients undergoing elective, open abdominal procedures. For each procedure, intraoperative case-relevant and case-irrelevant communication, and intraoperative distractions were observed continuously on site. The influence of communication and distractions on SSI after surgery was assessed using logistic regressions, adjusting for risk factors. RESULTS A total of 167 observed procedures were analysed; their mean(s.d.) duration was 4·6(2·1) h. A total of 24 SSIs (14·4 per cent) were diagnosed. Case-relevant communication during the procedure was independently associated with a reduced incidence of organ/space SSI (propensity score-adjusted odds ratio 0·86, 95 per cent c.i. 0·77 to 0·97; P = 0·014). Case-irrelevant communication during the closing phase of the procedure was independently associated with increased incidence of incisional SSI (propensity score-adjusted odds ratio 1·29, 1·08 to 1·55; P = 0·006). Distractions had no association with SSI. CONCLUSION More case-relevant communication was associated with fewer organ/space SSIs, and more case-irrelevant communication during wound closure was associated with incisional SSI.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Visceral Surgery
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Work and Organisational Psychology

UniBE Contributor:

Tschan, Franziska; Semmer, Norbert; Candinas, Daniel; Beldi, Guido and Kurmann, Anita

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
700 Arts > 790 Sports, games & entertainment

ISSN:

1365-2168

Publisher:

Wiley Interscience

Language:

English

Submitter:

Lilian Karin Smith-Wirth

Date Deposited:

02 Mar 2016 09:55

Last Modified:

06 Oct 2016 02:30

Publisher DOI:

10.1002/bjs.9927

PubMed ID:

26434921

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.77483

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/77483

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback