Global pulses of organic carbon burial in deep-sea sediments during glacial maxima

Cartapanis, Olivier; Bianchi, Daniele; Jaccard, Samuel; Galbraith, Eric D. (2016). Global pulses of organic carbon burial in deep-sea sediments during glacial maxima. Nature communications, 7, p. 10796. Nature Publishing Group 10.1038/ncomms10796

[img]
Preview
Text
Cartapanis et al., 16.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (853kB) | Preview

The burial of organic carbon in marine sediments removes carbon dioxide from the ocean–atmosphere pool, provides energy to the deep biosphere, and on geological timescales drives the oxygenation of the atmosphere. Here we quantify natural variations in the burial of organic carbon in deep-sea sediments over the last glacial cycle. Using a new data compilation of hundreds of sediment cores, we show that the accumulation rate of organic carbon in the deep sea was consistently higher (50%) during glacial maxima than during interglacials. The spatial pattern and temporal progression of the changes suggest that enhanced nutrient supply to parts of the surface ocean contributed to the glacial burial pulses, with likely additional contributions from more efficient transfer of organic matter to the deep sea and better preservation of organic matter due to reduced oxygen exposure. These results demonstrate a pronounced climate sensitivity for this global carbon cycle sink.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

10 Strategic Research Centers > Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research (OCCR)
08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geological Sciences

UniBE Contributor:

Cartapanis, Olivier and Jaccard, Samuel

Subjects:

500 Science > 550 Earth sciences & geology

ISSN:

2041-1723

Publisher:

Nature Publishing Group

Funders:

[4] Swiss National Science Foundation

Language:

English

Submitter:

Samuel Jaccard

Date Deposited:

21 Apr 2016 15:49

Last Modified:

21 Apr 2016 15:49

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/ncomms10796

PubMed ID:

26923945

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.79174

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/79174

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback