Determination of fatty acid ethyl esters in dried blood spots by LC-MS/MS as markers for ethanol intake: application in a drinking study.

Luginbühl, Marc Joel; Schröck, Alexandra; König, Stefan; Schürch, Stefan; Weinmann, Wolfgang (2016). Determination of fatty acid ethyl esters in dried blood spots by LC-MS/MS as markers for ethanol intake: application in a drinking study. Analytical and bioanalytical chemistry, 408(13), pp. 3503-3509. Springer 10.1007/s00216-016-9426-y

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The forensic utility of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in dried blood spots (DBS) as short-term confirmatory markers for ethanol intake was examined. An LC-MS/MS method for the determination of FAEEs in DBS was developed and validated to investigate FAEE formation and elimination in a drinking study, whereby eight subjects ingested 0.66-0.84 g/kg alcohol to reach blood alcohol concentrations (BAC) of 0.8 g/kg. Blood was taken every 1.5-2 h, BAC was determined, and dried blood spots were prepared, with 50 μL of blood, for the determination of FAEEs. Lower limits of quantitation (LLOQ) were between 15 and 37 ng/mL for the four major FAEEs. Validation data are presented in detail. In the drinking study, ethyl palmitate and ethyl oleate proved to be the two most suitable markers for FAEE determination. Maximum FAEE concentrations were reached in samples taken 2 or 4 h after the start of drinking. The following mean peak concentrations (c̅ max) were reached: ethyl myristate 14 ± 4 ng/mL, ethyl palmitate 144 ± 35 ng/mL, ethyl oleate 125 ± 55 ng/mL, ethyl stearate 71 ± 21 ng/mL, total FAEEs 344 ± 91 ng/mL. Detectability of FAEEs was found to be on the same time scale as BAC. In liquid blood samples containing ethanol, FAEE concentrations increase post-sampling. This study shows that the use of DBS fixation prevents additional FAEE formation in blood samples containing ethanol. Positive FAEE results obtained by DBS analysis can be used as evidence for the presence of ethanol in the original blood sample. Graphical Abstract Time courses for fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE) concentrations in DBS and ethanol concentrations for subject 1 over a period of 7 h. Ethanol ingestion occured during the first hour of the time course.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Legal Medicine
08 Faculty of Science > Departement of Chemistry and Biochemistry
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Legal Medicine > Forensic Chemistry and Toxicology

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences (GCB)

UniBE Contributor:

Luginbühl, Marc Joel; Schröck, Alexandra; König, Stefan; Schürch, Stefan and Weinmann, Wolfgang

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
500 Science > 540 Chemistry

ISSN:

1618-2642

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Antoinette Angehrn

Date Deposited:

23 Mar 2016 08:58

Last Modified:

12 Mar 2017 02:30

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00216-016-9426-y

PubMed ID:

26968564

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Abstinence monitoring; Alcohol marker; Dried blood spots; Fatty acid ethyl ester; LC–MS/MS; Whole blood

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.79745

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/79745

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