Metabolic and hormonal response to intermittent high-intensity and continuous moderate intensity exercise in individuals with type 1 diabetes: a randomised crossover study.

Bally, Lia; Züger, Thomas; Buehler, Tania; Dokumaci, Ayse Sila; Speck, Christian; Pasi, Nicola; Ciller, Carlos; Paganini, Daniela; Feller, Katrin Madeleine; Loher, Hannah; Rosset, Robin; Wilhelm, Matthias; Tappy, Luc; Boesch, Christoph Hans; Stettler, Christoph (2016). Metabolic and hormonal response to intermittent high-intensity and continuous moderate intensity exercise in individuals with type 1 diabetes: a randomised crossover study. Diabetologia, 59(4), pp. 776-784. Springer 10.1007/s00125-015-3854-7

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AIMS/HYPOTHESIS To investigate exercise-related fuel metabolism in intermittent high-intensity (IHE) and continuous moderate intensity (CONT) exercise in individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus. METHODS In a prospective randomised open-label cross-over trial twelve male individuals with well-controlled type 1 diabetes underwent a 90 min iso-energetic cycling session at 50% maximal oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]), with (IHE) or without (CONT) interspersed 10 s sprints every 10 min without insulin adaptation. Euglycaemia was maintained using oral (13)C-labelled glucose. (13)C Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) served to quantify hepatocellular and intramyocellular glycogen. Measurements of glucose kinetics (stable isotopes), hormones and metabolites complemented the investigation. RESULTS Glucose and insulin levels were comparable between interventions. Exogenous glucose requirements during the last 30 min of exercise were significantly lower in IHE (p = 0.02). Hepatic glucose output did not differ significantly between interventions, but glucose disposal was significantly lower in IHE (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in glycogen consumption. Growth hormone, catecholamine and lactate levels were significantly higher in IHE (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION IHE in individuals with type 1 diabetes without insulin adaptation reduced exogenous glucose requirements compared with CONT. The difference was not related to increased hepatic glucose output, nor to enhanced muscle glycogen utilisation, but to decreased glucose uptake. The lower glucose disposal in IHE implies a shift towards consumption of alternative substrates. These findings indicate a high flexibility of exercise-related fuel metabolism in type 1 diabetes, and point towards a novel and potentially beneficial role of IHE in these individuals. TRIAL REGISTRATION ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02068638 FUNDING: Swiss National Science Foundation (grant number 320030_149321/) and R&A Scherbarth Foundation (Switzerland).

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

10 Strategic Research Centers > ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research > ARTORG Center - Image Guided Therapy > ARTORG Center - Ophthalmic Technology Lab
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Clinical Nutrition
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine (DRNN) > Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology > DCR Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Methodology (AMSM)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Cardiovascular Disorders (DHGE) > Clinic of Cardiology

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences (GCB)

UniBE Contributor:

Bally, Lia; Züger, Thomas; Buehler, Tania; Dokumaci, Ayse Sila; Ciller, Carlos; Feller, Katrin Madeleine; Loher, Hannah; Wilhelm, Matthias; Boesch, Christoph Hans and Stettler, Christoph

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0012-186X

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Christoph Hans Boesch

Date Deposited:

12 May 2016 11:26

Last Modified:

21 Jun 2017 10:45

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00125-015-3854-7

PubMed ID:

26739816

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Carbohydrate metabolism; Exercise; Hypoglycaemia; Metabolic physiology in vivo

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.80739

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/80739

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